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I want to make homemade mint chocolate chip ice cream but I'm not sure what type of chocolate to use. It seems like the chips in most ice cream are actually chunks of a thin sheet of dark chocolate that's much crunchier than if you just chopped up a bar of chocolate.

Does anyone know what type of chocolate chips are used in most ice creams and where I can buy them or how I can make them?

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

If they are crunchy when frozen they are probably made from regular compound chocolate, not freezing grade chocolate

You should be able to buy compound chocolate "chips" from any food wholesaler or baking supply store. They are the same as used in chocolate muffins

For frozen chocolate to still have a chocolate feel and taste when eaten it needs to be made with peanut oil (or similar) so as to have a melt point more like chocolate at room temperature when frozen

Regular "Real" chocolate can end up being like eating crayons

Real chocolate with a low cocoa butter, but high cocoa solid level generally freeze much better

Chocolate chips often come in 3kg or 5 kg bags, if you are not using them in a hurry, keep the surplus in the freezer :-)

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Another thing with chocolate and ice cream, is to freeze the chocolate before putting it into the ice cream mix, or you may get melting and colour bleed during the mixing process –  TFD Mar 7 '11 at 9:47
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I don't know the real answer, but I always use dark chocolate nibs in mine, and it always comes out great. It's not the exact same experience as commercial mint chocolate chip but really delivers on that mint hit in the beginning and the crunchy slightly bitter end that a good mint chocolate chip should deliver.

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