Take the 2-minute tour ×
Seasoned Advice is a question and answer site for professional and amateur chefs. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This may be an odd question, but someone told me it's better to store your eggs upside down (the pointy side down). The explanation was that there's an air bubble on the bottom of the egg that wants to go up. If you put it upside down, the pressure on the membrane is less and it stays longer.

Is there any truth about this?

share|improve this question
1  
Excellent quetsion, I've heard this too –  nixy Mar 18 '11 at 17:13
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

By "it stays longer" do you mean that the egg stays good longer or the membrane/air pocket stays around longer?

I don't know why you would care about the air pocket so I'll go with the other.

Orientation is not going to noticeably affect egg quality. I don't use egg cartons. I store my eggs in plastic tubs (carefully). The eggs end up in a random orientation and there is no noticeable difference between any two eggs.

I have heard to people storing the eggs differently to center the yolks in preparation for boiling. This is purely a cosmetic thing.

share|improve this answer
1  
I'm not sure what I meant either ;-) Perhaps if there's a constant pressure on the membrane, the membrane will become thinner, so the egg would go bad a bit more rapidly than if you'd store it upside down. I'm just curious if this would make any sense. –  Mien Mar 18 '11 at 15:26
4  
@Mien- the membrane breaking down doesn't make an egg go bad but is an indicator of freshness. My gut reaction is that it probably isn't worth worrying about. If you are buying eggs from the store then they are already so old that it won't matter. I'll do an experiment with the next dozen eggs that my chickens lay and I'll let you know. –  Sobachatina Mar 18 '11 at 15:31
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.