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If I can, would there be any difference in the measurements? For example if the recipe calls for 8 ounces of cream cheese, would it be the same amount of cottage?

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4 Answers

I've made cheesecake with many different types of cheese and it pretty much always worked.

Of course texture and taste vary, but that's the beauty of it. Try a single cheese, see what it gives and then start experimenting mixing them.

For instance cottage cheese tends to give a slightly more "crumbly" texture. To compact it you can add some fresh cream.

Sour cream also makes a wonderful addition, and marries well with some lemon zest, taken that you like a bit of acidity in your cake.

I've also tried to add mascarpone and even gorgonzola, they all work well, and give you very peculiar mouth-feelings to combine and mix as you please, but obviously add in calory content quite a bit...

As for the amount, you an just keep the same as cream cheese.

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What sorts of cheese? Anything close to cottage cheese, and any idea how that might affect texture? –  Jefromi Aug 8 '11 at 3:29
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I've used cottage cheese and it makes the cake slightly more "crumbly". To compact it you can add some fresh cream. Sour cream also makes a wonderful addition, and marries well with some lemon zest. I've also tried to add mascarpone and even gorgonzola, they all work well, and give you very peculiar mouth-feelings to combine and mix as you please. –  nico Aug 8 '11 at 5:30
    
Aha, a voice of experience! +1 (You might want to edit the "crumbly" part into your answer, to help it more directly address the OP's question.) –  Jefromi Aug 8 '11 at 6:20
    
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ABSOLUTELY you can substitute cottage cheese (even fat free) for cream cheese in a cheesecake recipe. Small curd seems to work best--possibly because a bit more of the moisture is retained in the product after draining. After running the cottage cheese through a food processor (I've not found a blender quite powerful enough), you're left with an awesome soft cheese perfect for cheesecake recipes. To drain the curds, use a cheese cloth lined colander. I usually allow for about five minutes of drain time before running it through the processor.

(Hint: UN-drained cottage cheese run through a food processor is a delicious substitute for cream cheese in cream cheese frosting)

If you're pinched for time, why not try neufchatel cheese if you're looking to cut the fat but still have a yummy outcome?

Something else that helps ensure a less crumbly finish in the lower fat cheese cakes...use powdered sugar for half of the sugar in your recipe.

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If your worried about the setting of the cheesecake why not add some gelatine or a pinch of cream of tartar.

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In which proportions and how sould it be added to the cheese? –  J.A.I.L. Nov 9 '12 at 10:40
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i don't know the science behind it, but even if you thoroughly blended your cottage cheese beforehand (so there's no lumps) i still would think that there would be a serious consistency and flavor difference between the two. the flavor difference might not be unpleasant, but cottage cheese is so much more fluid than cream cheese, which might cause problems in the baking and setting of the cheesecake. to be honest, if it were me, i would try it anyway (equal measurements and all) because that's one way to learn.

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