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Beating of the whites is perfected.

When folding in the cake mixture and the egg whites is there a specific technique?

I place in about 1/3, fold, 1/3, fold, and the rest using a spatula, and turn the bowl to get it folded evenly.

Do I leave the cake to cool in the oven with the door open ajar? And for how long?

Or is there a specific way to cook it, e.g. high temp then low temp?

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1  
Aaronut's comment on the answer to your previous question suggests that cooling in the oven is indeed a good idea, and the answer itself suggests an amount of time. I don't think this is an exact duplicate, since you do also ask about other parts of the process, and that could be useful to others, but since you say your cakes look great until they cool, it sounds like your question might have already been answered? –  Jefromi Dec 9 '11 at 15:33
    
Are you sure you are working from a good recipe? Too little flour or too many eggs can cause sponge cake to deflate. Also, are you putting the batter into the oven as soon as it's mixed? –  Laura Kane-Punyon Jan 28 '12 at 0:55

2 Answers 2

You are using a bundt or tube pan, yes? A chiffon cake will need the extra support in provides, and after taking it out of the oven it should be inverted until completely cool. A bottle can make a good cooling rack, just put the hole of the pan around the neck and put it somewhere it won't be knocked over. Cooling in the oven is good too.

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Many sponge cake forms are made with removable bottoms and tabs that stick up on the sides.

The purpose of the removable bottom is obvious, run a knife around the side and push the cake out. However, the tabs allow for a marvoulous technique when cooling your sponge cake.

When your cake is done cooking and ready to let cool, you invert it without running your knife around the edge. The tabs keep the pan above the table/rack and allow for the air to circulate. Gravity helps to maintain the height of the cake because the cake is still stuck to the bottom and sides of the pan. As it cools, the little stretching action from gravity gives you a higher/fluffier product.

It doesn't completely solve your shrinkage issue but it helps out allot.

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