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The ignition is clicking on my burner even though I turned it off. How do I stop this?

I unplugged the cooktop, but I don't know if it is safe to leave it this way. What should I look for? Can I keep it unplugged safely for any length of time?

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if you're still able to read this, there should be valve nearby the cooktop. turn it perpendicular to close. –  KMC Jan 3 '12 at 5:31
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@KMC, IF she's still able to read this? Man you have a morbid sense of humor. Haha –  Jay Jan 3 '12 at 5:37
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3 Answers 3

I bought a used cooktop off ebay once that did the same thing. I discovered it to be one of the dials which was catching in the ignite position (although the dial didn't look depressed). Give the dials a good workout when the ignitor is clicking away--you might release the switch.

That fixed it for me and I soon identified the culprit dial. Every so often the constant ignition would come back but I'd just smack the guilty dial and it would stop.

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One of my old gas stoves would click as you describe when the ignitor got wet or clogged up with foodstuff. Taking the top off each burner unit, if possible, and cleaning around in there might help.

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The only purpose of plugging in a gas stove is for the electric ignition to work. This is malfunctioning for you, but it is not a safety problem. The gas output is controlled by turning the knobs on and off. You can successfully and safely use your gas burners by lighting them with a match.

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It's a minor point, but many gas stoves have timers, clocks, and lights that won't work if the stove is unplugged. –  Ward Jan 3 '12 at 20:42
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Also I think I recall some units have gas leak detection sensors on them, which will require power. That said, my unit simply uses power for ignition and need not be connected. –  jontyc Jan 3 '12 at 22:37
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