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Say I buy a bag of Callebaut Cocoa Powder (like this one). What's the best way to store the powder once I begin using it? Figure that I'll use no more than 1/3 to 1/2 a cup of cocoa powder a week.

Thanks!

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Welcome to the site! It's generally best to ask questions separately, so that you can get good answers for both. I've gone ahead and edited out your question about where to buy baking supplies. Note also that you might be best off just asking about online shopping - though you seem to have already found a place. The best physical stores for baking supplies will completely depend on your specific location (especially since you've ruled out national chains), and this site isn't really a good place to have a question per city about everything. –  Jefromi Jan 22 '12 at 17:13
    
I thought the post-script might be over reaching but figured it would be worth a shot. Thanks for the suggestion. –  StevieP Jan 23 '12 at 4:51

1 Answer 1

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Store cocoa powder in a dark, cool, dry place, sealed against vermin. Dark and cool both slow the process by which volatiles (i.e., flavor) degrade. That said, don't keep it in the fridge or freezer unless sealed airtight, because both types of chill-chests are relatively humid environments. Humidity promotes mold, even on cocoa.

By the way, for future reference: When buying cocoa powder, note the manufacturer's suggested use-by date. Cocoa powder should last about three years, properly stored. If the use-by date is much less than that, look for another container.

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I was concerned more how to store, not where to store. But if I read you correctly, keeping it in any airtight container (e.g. a freezer bag) and in a dark cabinet somewhere should be fine, eh? –  StevieP Feb 16 '12 at 6:29
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@StevieP, Sorry, perhaps I wasn't clear. You've got it exactly right -- an airtight container in a dark place is perfect. Be a little cautious about plastic bags; some of the "freezer" zip-top bags are sufficiently porous to permit a slow exchange of gas. Better to get a glass or ceramic jar with a rubber seal. –  Bruce Goldstein Feb 17 '12 at 13:16

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