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I made a carrot soup without the use of a blender as described in previous question link. Which was to chop the carrots and onions really small. The problem is that the result is quite watery.

In the recipe for goulash, I use flour to thicken the soup, in the frying stage. Can I do something similar here? Or will it ruin the taste. I was imagining throughing in some flour with the carrots and onions as they fry.

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The result doesn't have to be watery when doing it that way - cook the vegetables, mash, add a bit of liquid, mash more, and then just add as much liquid as you want to get the texture you want. –  Jefromi Jan 26 '12 at 15:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

How much flavor the flour adds will depend largely on how long it fries with the veggies.

The longer it fries the nuttier it will taste- until it starts to burn of course. If it doesn't cook for long enough (it doesn't take long) it will taste raw which is not pleasant.

You should cook your veggies until they are done and then add your flour and cook just until it starts to smell nutty. I assume this is similar to what you do with your goulash.

Overall- I think that the flavor of even a fairly dark roux would work well with an onion and carrot soup. You could even use this to salvage your already watery soup by making a roux separately and wisking it in.

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I was thinking perhaps adding starch would be a better idea than adding flour. –  Jay Jan 26 '12 at 15:11
    
@Jay- it's the starch in the flour that does the thickening anyway. You could use a different kind of starch but that wasn't really his question. –  Sobachatina Jan 26 '12 at 15:17

Add a roux to your soup. And/or use corn starch. Adding just flour would make for a pretty unpleasant end product, I think.

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Roux is certainly a good recommendation, but it's not necessary. You can do exactly what the OP said - mix flour in during frying. It's like making a roux while also cooking the rest; the flour gets distributed over the surfaces of the vegetables, and mixed with a little bit of oil. It's not at all unpleasant - I've done it. –  Jefromi Jan 26 '12 at 16:47
    
Agreed. I do this all the time with stews and soups. As long as you cook out the flour a little it's fine. –  ElendilTheTall Jan 26 '12 at 17:44
    
Ah, I missed the part of adding during frying. My bad. –  Sean Hart Jan 26 '12 at 19:37

When I make my carrot soup I thicken with rice flour but potato or corn starch should also work

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