Seasoned Advice is a question and answer site for professional and amateur chefs. Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Here's how it works:
  1. Anybody can ask a question
  2. Anybody can answer
  3. The best answers are voted up and rise to the top

I love my bread machine. However when the bread is done baking, removing it from the machine breaks the bread where the paddle is. I know the paddle is embedded in the bread and it will break the bread a little. I am looking for ideas on how to prevent it or at least make it smaller.

Should I:

  • Remove the paddle before the second rising/the baking?
  • Oil the paddle before I add the ingredients? (tried it, does not work very well)
  • Do something else?
share|improve this question
7  
It's designed that way so your guests know you cheated :-) – TFD Feb 26 '12 at 19:44
up vote 7 down vote accepted

I used to remove the paddle before the second rising to avoid breaking the bread. Did not find any other good way of doing it.

share|improve this answer

I'm afraid the best answer might be to upgrade your bread machine. Newer designs have paddle shapes designed to minimise breaking the bread. I've even seen paddles that fold flat when they're not moving so as to not even get stuck in the bread. No idea how well that works.

share|improve this answer

I am new to this "baking hobby using a bread maker". I have faced the same challenge, and at this very moment am experimenting to find the best "trick" to avoid having unsightly impressions created by the machine paddlers; therefore, I would like to share with you what I have "come to know" basically through experimenting, and some confirmed through readings:

Basically the bread maker is used for making bread and cakes; for cakes the solution is simple and straight forward.. simply because the cake ingredients whence mixed they become in a semi fluid state; to remove the paddles before the baking cycle or just when it starts, you can simply do the following:

Use a kitchen hand-held mixer (egg whisker) with suitable design, and insert it in the pan so the large end would form something like a net around the bread maker paddle/s, and gently pull up. You should experiment with this with the bread maker (B/M) pan empty and the machine is turned off and unplugged.

As for breads.. I have experimented with removing the paddles at different times during the operation of the bread maker, but always before the baking cycle or when it had just started. I must say that I am still experimenting to find the absolute right moment of time to do so; and I believe its only logical to tackle this matter (and experiment) with the understanding that different B/M have different timing with regard to when best to remove the paddles so the bread will not be adversely affected; and actually today I came across this very interesting page referring to this specific point:

http://blog.kingarthurflour.com/2015/02/17/successful-loaves-from-your-bread-machine/

share|improve this answer
    
Welcome to the site! Thank you for this thorough, well-written, answer. We hope you stay here and have a lot of fun! – Sue Jun 21 at 0:39
    
To the above I should add that with regard to cakes, I have noticed that when making a cake with chocolate it's not very practical to use the manual mixer as explained in my above first comment because the mixture after kneading becomes too thick; I found using hand to remove the paddle/s is more practical in this case. (Thank you Sue for your kind comment), – Omran Al-Kwari Jun 22 at 18:40
    
To the above I should add that with regard to cakes, I have noticed that when making a cake with chocolate, for example, it's not very practical to use the manual mixer as explained in comments above, because such mixture after kneading becomes too thick; I found using hand to remove the paddle/s is more practical in this case. May I add another point which might be helpful with regard to removing the bread or cake from the pan after it has cooled; and that is to turn the pin/shaft/s about a quarter turn in both directions from below the base of the pan. (Thank you Sue for your kind comment), – Omran Al-Kwari Jun 22 at 19:04

I love my bread machine, it's great time saving "cheat" but I never bake in it. I like my loaves looking like I actually baked them. It's just a tiny extra step to let the bread maker do all of the hard work then shape the loaves and bake them in the oven.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.