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We bought some pizza bases the other day and I just realized the package says to store below 4°C (39°F). We didn't store them in the fridge. Will these be safe to eat?

They contain wheat flour and yeast.

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Did you store them at room temperature or did the store do that? –  Mien Mar 21 '12 at 10:36
    
we did - not sure where they were in the shop, no matter - gone now –  Adam Butler Mar 21 '12 at 21:29
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The default answer is NO. You don't know how long the pizza bases have been left outside, but most likely more than 4 hours.

Before you open the package, see if it's vacuum packed or in a protective environment. If it's vacuum packed but bulging, throw it out, it can have dangerous levels of botulism toxins that are mortal. If it's not vacuum packed and bulging, you don't know...

You should open the package and smell. Yeast doesn't smell pleasant, but it has a distinctive smell. So, if it smells like yeast, and if you don't see any dark spots (of mold) on the base, and if you are a healthy adult, you could risk it (at your own risk). If you do see mold, just throw it out.

Do not give risky food to children or the elderly, ever.

At any rate, for the price of a pizza base, just throw it out. Make your own pizza base! Even cheaper than store bought and more fun.

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Botulinus growing in pizza dough? –  nico Mar 21 '12 at 21:07
    
Why not? I'm not an expert :-( This wikipedia article doesn't say there's any reason not to have botulism in a pizza dough. –  BaffledCook Mar 21 '12 at 21:08
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Not sure either, but Clostridium botulinus is an obligate anaerobe and pizza dough sounds like a fairly aerobic substrate to me... –  nico Mar 21 '12 at 21:11
    
Not at all. The yeast transforms oxygen in carbon dioxide. In a closed environment... –  BaffledCook Mar 21 '12 at 21:14
    
Actually yeasts transforms sugar in CO2. –  nico Mar 21 '12 at 21:23
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