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I have just returned from having purchased a can of kimchi. I have no idea what the contents are, since they are written in Korean, but thought that mixing it into the broth at the last minute might increase the soup's flavour.

Is there a flaw in my reasoning?

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"I have no idea what the contents are" - are you trying to ask what kimchi is? –  Jefromi Apr 12 '12 at 0:58
    
I am presuming that the main ingredient is fermented cabbage, I am unaware what else, if anythihg, is considered "standard" for kimchi. –  Doug Apr 12 '12 at 1:30
    
Depends on what kind of noodles you use and what else is in the soup. Some soups taste very good with kimchi or sauerkraut. You can cook your soup without kimchi and then add some to the first plate. –  Mischa Arefiev Apr 12 '12 at 11:03

3 Answers 3

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Kimchi are not preferred to be added directly to soup. Usually you would fry the Kimchi (ideally in Sesame oil) to slightly transparent or having minor brown on the edges, before adding into the soup, and boil for . That is not only applicable to KimChi JiGae- but also other varieties of KimChi broth (e.g. hotpot, Kimchi ramen/noodles (BuDae JiGae) etc.)

Adding Kimchi directly to soup/broth and boil is more a Northern Chinese way of cooking (where Kimchi is not called kimchi but literally called "Spicy Pickled Cabbage").

Frying beforehand and adding directly to soup/water can taste very, very different.

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Not at all. Heres a recipe you could try http://norecipes.com/blog/kimchi-jigae-recipe-kimchi-soup/

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Absent any information (not even a picture?) I'd assume it's the common variety with the dominant seasoning being spicy red chili. It's certainly a reasonable thing to put in a soup: kimchi soup and kimchi stew are popular dishes. It's also a very common standard side dish. If you're unsure, just open the can, taste it, and see what you think you'll like best.

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