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I want to make Nutella cookies. I've found a recipe for it, but it's in volume measurements. It asks for a cup of Nutella and I don't own a cup.

I tried searching my regular converters, but the only one with a hit was Wolfram-Alpha and I've noticed this result can be quite wrong.

Is anybody kind enough to weigh a cup of Nutella? Or do you use a converter that knows the weight of a cup of Nutella?

Note: I do own a tablespoon measure, so if nobody knows, I'll just scoop out some and calculate it myself. And post it as an answer of course.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I actually measured and weighed a cup of Nutella and I got 290g. Of course we have to take into consideration my 1 cup measurement (I'm pretty sure they are not exactly the same) and my scale. But it just shows that the 300g mark is not far off.

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Here's my trick for measuring sticky, dense things like Nutella: Take whatever liquid you're using and measure an amount, like 1 cup. add the Nutella to the liquid and the level will rise to the measurement you need. For example, if I need 1/2 cup of Nutella and there is milk in my recipe, I'll put 1 cup of milk on my measuring cup, add enough Nutella to bring the combined volume to 1.5 cups. Makes cleaning easier too.

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2  
Hi Big Crank. Did you actually read the question? How is the OP supposed to put anything in a measuring cup if he doesn't own a measuring cup? –  Marti Feb 18 at 16:58
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Although this was not helpful for me particularly, I can imagine it is useful for some people. Thanks for your input! –  Mien Feb 19 at 19:24

On my Nutella jar it says that 2 tablespoons of the deliciousness is 37 grams. So, 37x8= 296 grams of Nutella is one cup.

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2  
What's with the downvote? The larger the initial measurement, the less error propagation you get, so this answer is probably closer to accurate than the accepted answer. –  Marti Aug 4 '13 at 3:24

The density of Nutella is 1.2g/ml. Therefore 300grams is equal to 250ml.

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5  
Where did you find the density? Or did you measure it yourself? –  slim Jan 31 '13 at 18:16

According to the nutella nutritional fact label, 1 tbsp = 19g.

There are 16 tbsp in a cup so 16 * 19g = 304g

enter image description here

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7  
I doubt its going to matter in this case, but you've got some inaccuracies there. First, 19g is presumably 19±0.5g, so you could be off by up to 8g from that. Second, 1T on a nutrition label is a tiny bit bigger than 1T in a recipe (yes, not only does the US have weird measuring units, we have two sets of them under identical names! See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cup_%28unit%29 for details) –  derobert May 10 '12 at 20:56
    
@derobert, thanks, I did not know that. So "1 cup" in a recipe, is the customary cup I assume? But I agree that it won't matter for my cookies. –  Mien May 11 '12 at 19:32
    
@Mien: 1 cup in the recipe is probably the customary cup. Or, really, the size of the measuring cup the recipe author used. Calibration of measuring cups is often very loose. –  derobert May 11 '12 at 20:57

Nutella is a bit specialised for most online converters, but butter is virtually the same density, and a cup of that weighs 238g. I wouldn't think you'd go far wrong with that.

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I like onlineconversion.com/weight_volume_cooking.htm if you find the product density online, it can be entered to give exact results –  Pat Sommer May 13 '12 at 7:01

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