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I'm trying to make a dessert I had in Palermo, Sicily. I wanted to find a recipe for it online, but I can't remember the name of it now. I know it's fairly common, but googling didn't help. It's basically just a large round flaky pastry with a large opening in the center and filled with a chocolate cream. The cream is not hidden by the pastry, but it is in the open. It's similar to a danish.

Edit by rumtscho

Unless I am terribly mistaken, this question is about this thing, only with a chocolate creme instead of vanilla pudding in the middle:

vanilleplunder

And no, I don't know an English name for that thing more special than "Danish", else I would have answered already.

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Are you sure it has a name? "The danish as consumed in Denmark can be topped with chocolate, sugar or icing, and may be stuffed with either jam, marzipan or custard. Shapes are numerous, including circles with filling in the middle (known as "Spandauer's"), figure-eights, spirals (known as snails), and the pretzel-like kringles." (from the English Wikipedia article on Danish). So it seems that all shapes and fillings are covered by the word "danish". –  rumtscho May 23 '12 at 11:43
    
When you say round do you mean it's circular or tubular? –  ElendilTheTall May 23 '12 at 11:50
    
Round as in circular. Rumtscho might be correct, maybe it was just a danish. –  Zipper May 23 '12 at 11:53
    
It is possible that there is a local name for this variation, for example the same thing but filled with soft cheese and rum instead of chocolate is called Quarktasche in German. –  rumtscho May 23 '12 at 14:08
    
umm tart?....... –  Midhat May 24 '12 at 19:13
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4 Answers 4

i think this is what you looking for its called pierre herme chocolate eclairs and this is extremely good

enter image description here

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For reference, the recipe for that can be found here: applepiepatispate.com/french/chocolate-eclairs-pierre-herme Note that Pierre Hermé doesn't have any stores in Sicily: pierreherme.com/storelocations I'm somewhat doubtful that this pastry fits the description given by Zipper. –  Rinzwind May 28 '12 at 11:57
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That sounds a lot like a Czech Kolache, except that usually has fruit in the middle rather than chocolate. I suspect a lot of European regions have something similar. Some bakeries have made variations with different fillings

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kolache)

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Is it the calzone ..or the Eclair?? I looked up some italian desserts and found something called chocolate Canollo I also know that in Sicily they have the kinda of a puff pastry filled with all kinda stuffings called Bigne ! Hope this was helpful

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Do you actually think any of these match the OP's description? Bigne are more spherical and closed (the filling is completely inside); eclairs are elongated and closed (with icing); cannoli are elongated with the filling inside and open ends; calzones aren't even desserts. –  Jefromi Oct 3 '12 at 19:45
    
@Jefromi: There do exist dessert calzoni, but I've always seen them qualified as dolci ("sweet"). –  Josh Caswell Dec 17 '12 at 20:13
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Maybe you mean an "occhio di bue", it is quite common to find it in the italian bakeries and you can find the recipe here: http://www.tortealcioccolato.com/2008/07/01/occhi-di-bue/ (sorry but the only site I found is in italian)

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No, this can't be it - the OP says "flaky pastry", and this recipe is for cookies, made from normal cookie dough. (I am 90% sure "levito" must be a chemical leavener here, like baking powder. Even if it means yeast, this recipe is not for flaky pastry). –  rumtscho Jul 31 '12 at 19:24
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