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I want to use ground nuts in a pavlova meringue, but I am having difficulty deciding what cooking technique would be best to use - recipes for meringue with nuts added seem to require a higher heat (350f/ 175 C) and shorter cooking time, cooling out of the oven, whereas the traditional pavlova meringue requires a hot oven turned low and cooling completely in oven. I want the base to have the texture of a traditional pavlova, I suspect the other method produces a moister, chewier result, but would like to be sure. Also, if making in the traditional style, should I still add cornflour or will the nuts substitute for the cornflour?

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I cannot answer all your questions, but I know that nuts can never replace cornflour. Cornflour contains a lot of starch, and nuts do not. –  Henrik Söderlund Jun 28 '12 at 13:29
    
I again cannot answer your question but I never add vinegar and cornflour to my meringue/pavlova recipe, just egg whites and sugar, so it would be ok to leave out the corn flour.I would suggest using the same technique as you do for "normal" meringues, the recipes I have with added ingredients such as nuts still say bake low heat and leave in oven to cool. –  scottishpink Jul 5 '12 at 3:25
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1 Answer

A meringue with nuts in it is called a "japonaise". If you search this, you will see many different recipes for a nutty meringue. All meringues are crunchy in the beginning but become moist when left out or filled, provided they are properly cooked in the beginning. I wouldn't worry about the texture as long as you use the meringues right away or store them properly (wrapped air tight and in a dry place - NO HUMIDITY).

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