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Yesterday I indulged in a real luxury, I had Giordano's Pizza, (from Chicago) delivered to me in Oklahoma. It takes two days notice and six hours to thaw the pizza before you can 'finish' baking it; BUT OH IT IS WORTH IT...

Of course, what would be better is if I could make Giordano's style pizza at home. There are really only two things I need to accomplish this, the CRUST and the sauce (part 2). How do you make a deep dish pizza crust that will mimic Giordano's?

The crust at Giordano's is in (what I would call) the 'hand tossed' thickness, but when baked is 'substantial enough' to hold up the (considerable weight) of the pizza but is not 'too crispy'. It browns up nicely on the outside and on the top layer (is this possibly a 'different crust') it bakes thoroughly while inside the pizza. (possible 'technique' sidebar: should the pizza be partially baked before the top most layers of sauce and cheese are added?). When I have tried to make this style of pizza at home the crust has either failed to bake through, when burnt on the outside it isn't 'done' (too doughy) on the inside.

(note: this 'recipe request' falls under the "restaurant mimicry" rule for Seasoned Advice)

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Following the guidelines set forth in the meta post that you specifically linked to, you should explain what specifically it is about this crust that makes it unique and/or that you can't replicate with ordinary recipes. –  Aaronut Aug 4 '12 at 19:54
    
@Aaronut, good point, edit in progress (sauce question edit to follow as well.) –  Cos Callis Aug 4 '12 at 19:57
    
Can you include details on how you have attempted the crust in the past? Ingredients, cooking technique etc.? –  ElendilTheTall Aug 4 '12 at 21:07
    
Amusingly, when I ate at Giordiano's, I wasn't that wowed by it. –  FuzzyChef Aug 5 '12 at 18:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Unlike Neopolitan pizza crust, Chicago pizza crust is made with a heavy, relatively low-moisture dough with a LOT of oil (or, in some cases, butter) in it. These crusts are not blind-baked in any way; instead, they depend on the long cooking time (45min) and the high oil content to become crunchy despite being buried in toppings. If the frozen one doesn't take that long, it's probably because they're par-baking it before they ship it.

Having had Giordiano's pizza at the restaurant, the crust seemed to me to be typical for a chicago pizza crust, so try a general recipe and then tinker with it if it doesn't seem quite right.

Cooksillustrated did their typical workup of a butter-based Chicago Pizza crust in the Jan/Feb 2010 issue; I know people who have made that one and liked it (you can get it from Cooksillustred.com with a fee; there's also a video). Other internet resources:

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Thanks, the recipe link looks like just what I wanted. And, yes, according to their website Giordano's does par bake them before freezing them for shipment) –  Cos Callis Aug 5 '12 at 19:29

Use LOTS of oil (usually corn oil) and a very short knead time (under 2 minutes). Giordano's runs their dough through a sheeter, resulting in a thin piece of dough that is draped into the pan. The tomato sauce is made with 6-in-1 ground tomatoes and the cheese is made by Stella. They do not par-bake, but at home, it helps a lot to do so.

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