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Besides using it as a thickener for stews, soups, etc, how can I use up my corn flour (cornstarch in the US)?

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Entertainment! You can use it to make a non-newtonian fluid : instructables.com/id/… –  Joe Jul 21 '10 at 23:59
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Why do you want to "use it up"? It shouldn't spoil easily... –  Shog9 Jul 22 '10 at 0:49
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It looks like you're from Australia, so we should likely assume that you're referring to the very fine processed powder that Americans call 'cornstarch' and not the coarser 'corn meal' that has a little crunch to it, or the more flour-like 'masa harina' –  Joe Jul 22 '10 at 2:21
    
Yes I am currently living in Australia. Well spotted. –  zachary Jul 22 '10 at 6:22
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IMHO This really ought to be a wiki... –  Lee Jul 22 '10 at 7:25
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closed as not constructive by Chris Steinbach, rumtscho Jan 9 '13 at 15:49

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8 Answers

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A lot of Asian recipes use it as a simple form of batter. If you've ever wondered how they get that crispiness on tofu, chicken etc., it's probably cornflour. This is a good example...

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2008/oct/25/vegetarian-recipes-black-pepper-tofu

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I've always made Tempura batter using cornflour & plain flour, rather than any other flour (Wikipedia suggests just plain flour), with a ratio not too different to that found in this recipe.

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There are old cake frosting recipes made with corn flour (called "cornstarch" in the USA). You basically cook sugar, cornstarch, and flavorings. It ends up kind-of weird but it's seriously old-school.

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do you have a few links to such recipes? –  Earlz Jul 22 '10 at 1:37
    
No, I don't unfortunately - all the ones I have are in old disintegrating cookbooks. –  Pointy Jul 22 '10 at 3:30
    
The internet is your friend : cooks.com/rec/view/0,196,149179-249200,00.html –  Joe Jul 22 '10 at 11:20
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If the question is about cornmeal and not corn flour (corn starch?) then you could use it to make polenta. A simple search will turn up the recipe and variations. Good luck!

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I love polenta! With mushrooms! I'm all hungry now. –  drxzcl Jul 22 '10 at 7:54
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I think the OP is talking about corn starch (or cornflour as its called ;-)) –  Sam Holder Jul 22 '10 at 10:22
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If you're talking about masa harina (fine corn flour vs. the highly refined corn starch often used as a thickening or drying agent), then make atole or tortillas or tamales...

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I think the OP is talking about corn starch (or cornflour as its called ;-)) –  Sam Holder Jul 22 '10 at 10:22
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I fold in some cornflour to the meringue when making pavlova.

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I use it to coat fish before frying it.

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A cajun fish fry recipe I know uses this method. There are brands sold specifically for fish frying, as well. By this I mean what they call corn meal, course ground, and not what they call the finer corn starch here in the USA. –  zanlok Feb 1 '11 at 22:07
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This answer may not change anything at this point, but it is also great to make 'arepas' and 'empanadas'. Both are latin snacks (for which there are different recepies, but basically the same).

---Arepas--- I found two nice videos for the colombian version and I post both because you might wanna use tips from one or the other: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q0ksLLdXoNo (the dough is a bit sticky and make the arepas' shape by hand - which might be a bit tricky)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TnhPoMkJDOU (the dough is not so sticky and they have a little tip to make the arepas' shape)

---Empanadas--- This one has more work but they are really nice, and there is a video for this one in the same channel of the second video...

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