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I brought a 3 KG yogurt store in a container. The container mention to store it at temperature between 2 degree to 7 degree.

So, I put my 3 KG yogurt in the freezer. When I want to eat, I put to chill and later consume it, then I put it back to the freezer. This process repeat until the 3 KG yogurt is finished.

So, I was wondering if the whole process of freeze, chill, freeze, chill, ... may or will cause some "damage" (or spoil ) the yogurt?

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The freezing and thawing may make it a bit weepy, as the ice crystals form an melt, destroying some of the cross linked proteins that thicken the yogurt. For any other food, without an active culture, I would say as long as you keep it under 40 degrees and the total non-frozen time doesn't become unreasonable, it is safe to eat, but yoghurt has live cultures (or some of them do)--I don't know the science on that, although I suspect again it is a palatability issue, rather than a safety issue. I am making this a comment rather than an answer because I am not absolutely sure. –  SAJ14SAJ Nov 22 '12 at 22:11
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I hate yoghurt which has been frozen even once, as the emulsion separates and makes the texture totally wrong.

But if you don't see any problem with that, the only problem you are left with is food safety. After many cycles, you don't know how much time your food has spent thawed and how much time it has spent frozen. The solution is simple: put the yogurt into smaller containers, freeze them, and take out a single container for each use.

By the way, 3 kg of yogurt isn't that much, seeing that yogurt keeps for many weeks in a fridge. With a few yogurt-heavy recipes, you could get it finished without the need for freezing at all.

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