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Arepas are a traditional dish from Venezuelan cuisine. After eating them a couple of times, the other day I decided to try to cook them myself. I searched over the internet the recipe and I found several differences. Ones cooked it mixing the pre-cooked corn flour P.A.N. brand with water, others with milk. Some fry them in the oven, other in the pan. And there is even yellow or white corn flour.

So in brief my question is, what's better to cook arepas?

  • to use yellow or white pre-cooked corn flour?
  • to use water or milk?
  • to cook them in the oven or in the pan?
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This seems like asking for a recipe preference. I am not sure you can get a factual answer, just opinion. –  SAJ14SAJ Dec 3 '12 at 15:45
    
I agree with @SAJ14SAJ, what do you mean by better? –  GdD Dec 3 '12 at 16:09
    
The English wikipedia article on Arepas answers what's the traditional way to cook arepas for your questions. (Maybe you read the Spanish article, which doesn't answer that). –  J.A.I.L. Dec 4 '12 at 7:49
    
I think you would be better off looking into the difference each of the above recipe changes would make (i.e. milk may make for a more tender arepa vs. water and frying will change the outermost textures) –  Brendan Dec 5 '12 at 16:13
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

White pre-cooked corn flour, water, pinch of salt and cooked in the pan is the traditional way of making and cooking arepas.

However, cookery is a living and evolving subject and very much a matter of personal taste.

I strongly recommend you experiment with the different flours, milk or water or half and half, cooked in the pan and in the oven and decide for yourself which you prefer and which comes closest to the ones you've tried and liked.

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