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I just read today that Kiwifruit is used to tenderize meat. I wanted to make some fruit chutney anyway, normally I'd go for mango, but why not use kiwifruit fruit this time?

I read that the actinidin is responsible for this process but as far as I know it is denaturized cooking the Kiwifruit, thus I need the raw Kiwifruit.

So how should I prepare the raw Kiwifruit and the meat (I wanted to use chicken), how long should I let the meat marinade and how should I cook or fry the meat afterwards?

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As this is my first question here and I normally don't cook (talking/writing) english, feel free to edit the question if I got some words/tags wrong. –  Baarn Jan 3 '13 at 20:45
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Freeze the kiwi. When rock hard, beat the heck out of the chicken with it. –  Chris Cudmore Jan 3 '13 at 21:08
    
OK, I suppose I got my vocabulary wrong here… :P –  Baarn Jan 3 '13 at 21:10
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@ChrisCudmore before or after butchering? –  JoeFish Jan 3 '13 at 21:29
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@Nicholas in Germany the fruit is called Kiwi. However, using ChrisCudmores suggestion it doesn't even matter which one of the Kiwis you use to tenderize the meat, as long as it's frozen. –  Baarn Mar 5 '13 at 21:47

5 Answers 5

A friend if mine used 3 Kiwi fruit to marinade some venison and it turned it into mush overnight, I believe the formula is 1 Kiwi per 5 lbs of meat.

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This is similar to what I read elsewhere (thekitchn.com/tip-tenderizing-11683). The author suggests 1/2 of a kiwi per 3-4 pounds of meat. –  Tatiana Racheva Nov 27 '13 at 23:40

Kiwifruit is the best marinade for lamb - mix with sugar and spices add chilli mash or blend then apply cover with cling wrap leave overnight . It lasts wella ndtastes great - oh you need to add some finely chopped mint too

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Kiwifruit can be used for tenderising all meats but from what I have read you only leave it for one hour before cooking...otherwise you end up with mush...overnight may leave you with a chicken protein shake

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While I've never tried this experiment, I rather doubt that kiwi can denature meat faster than the human digestive system... –  Aaronut Mar 3 '13 at 14:24
    
I just read 3-4 hours for beef, so it's not out of the question. –  Tatiana Racheva Nov 27 '13 at 23:43

Without supplying a recipe, my best suggestion would be to blend/puree the kiwis with whatever other seasonings you would want to accompany the chicken and then split that amount in half. Use the first half to marinate the chicken (I would go for overnight at most) and then use the other half to cook into a chutney or glaze to get the nice rounded flavors that come from cooked fruits.

I think it would be a nice glaze with some spice added (cayenne, habanero, serranos) and some other aromatics.

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Yes Kiwifruit contains Actinidin, which is a great meat protein tenderiser

But it tastes crap, it is not a good accompaniment for meat, especially chicken. It is way too sweet tasting, sort of like serving chicken with fruit jam (preserve), if you like that, go for it!

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@TFD- Pork is often served with sweet sauces or fruit. Besides- isn't it illegal for you to speak badly of kiwi fruit? Don't you lose the ability to vote or something? –  Sobachatina Jan 3 '13 at 23:07
    
@Sobachatina Yep, lots of fruits go well with meats, but not usually very sweet or sweetened fruits. What Kiwifruit, some idiot imported a Kiwifruit disease, all our vines are dead now. Back to sheep –  TFD Jan 4 '13 at 1:25
    
In the discussion I read on thekitchn.com/tip-tenderizing-11683, the author speaks of cooking Korean short ribs. She says, kiwi is rubbed into the meat right before it is dipped in the sauce, so there's no marinating time specified. –  Tatiana Racheva Nov 27 '13 at 23:44

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