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I want to make semi-hard, unripened brined cheese, kind of like Nabulsi or Halloumi.

I already know how to make "fresh" cheese from cow milk, rennet and salt.

But, in my attempts, the resulting curds is far from being hard or semi-hard, unless I strain the curds many hours, but in the process I loose the freshness and fresh milk taste, and the cheese develop other more complex flavours, wich is usually good for a cheese, but not for the kind of cheese I want to make :)

I think I read somewhere that the curds in this kinds of semi-hard, unripened cheeses, just like mozzarella, needed to be cooked?

Is it possible to do this cheese with cow milk instead of goat milk?

For the brine, can I use the (in process produced) whey, in wich I add salt?

Can someone post a complete step by step procedure, or direct me to a web site with this procedure?

Thank you!

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I find your question somewhat contradictionary. Brine is a method of conserving cheese; brined cheeses are not meant to be eaten fresh or taste like fresh cheeses. While not all of them need a lengthy ripening process, a production time measured in "many hours" (as opposed to "many weeks" for ripened cheeses) is normal. Have you had the kind of cheese you are describing, where, and what was it called? –  rumtscho Feb 14 '13 at 18:14
    
Ok, I am sorry for the confusion about my use of the word fresh. Probably due to my lack of experience in cheese making :) I guess what I mean is: a simple, mild or milk taste cheese, as opposed to complex flavoured or strong cheese. And, in my experience, a ripening process as short as 48h at room temperature (to let the curds strain enough to be able to mold the cheese), is sufficient for the cheese to loses its milk taste and starts developing complex flavors. As for the kind of cheese, like I said in the first sentence of my question: Nabulsi or Halloumi for example. –  Pierre-David Belanger Feb 14 '13 at 18:55
    
I've made halloumi with goat's milk (and cow's milk), and I found the goat's milk version to be preferable. Halloumi is traditionally made with a large percentage of goat's milk anyway. It's definitely one of those cheeses that needs the curds cooked - it helps the texture & helps it achieve that "resistant to melting" consistency it's famous for. It helps to be sure your milk is VERY fresh (and unpasteurized, if possible), to help achieve the firm curd you're looking for. Also, I wouldn't use the whey for a brine - make your brine fresh. here's help: cheesemaking.com/Halloumi.html –  franko Feb 14 '13 at 19:28
1  
Thank you @franko for sharing your experience and pointing to me this great web site. I guess that one of my problem with cheese making is that I do not have access to unpasteurized milk, so my curds always end up too soft to be mold early. I will try to add Calcium Chloride, like they sugess. Anyways, if you create an answer with your comment, I will mark it as accepted. –  Pierre-David Belanger Feb 14 '13 at 19:58
    
I'm glad you find it helpful. I have made cheese with pasteurized milk, but I have had the best success with unpasteurized milk. When I have had to use pasteurized milk, I have found it helps to buy it from a local dairy. It seems like the further the dairy has to ship it, the more they tend to cook it beforehand to make it safer for long-term delivery. A local dairy doesn't have to be so heavy-handed. Calcium chloride will help you a lot! [EDIT: typos] –  franko Feb 15 '13 at 1:48

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I've made halloumi with goat's milk (and cow's milk), and I found the goat's milk version to be preferable. Halloumi is traditionally made with a large percentage of goat's milk anyway. It's definitely one of those cheeses that needs the curds cooked - it helps the texture & helps it achieve that "resistant to melting" consistency it's famous for. It helps to be sure your milk is VERY fresh (and unpasteurized, if possible), to help achieve the firm curd you're looking for. Also, I wouldn't use the whey for a brine - make your brine fresh. here's help: cheesemaking.com/Halloumi.html

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