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(This may be a silly question, but I'll ask anyway since I am curious about this.)

We have an older fridge and it has a drawer labeled "snack pan." I'm not sure how to understand "snack" here.

  • What is a snack pan refrigerator drawer intended to hold? Is it primarily for deli meats? Or else should deli meats go in the "chilled meat compartment"? What else goes in a snack pan?

  • Is the benefit of a snack pan drawer to simply provide a place for smaller/shorter items to keep the shelves free for other things, or does food being in snack pan affect the food differently (such as how the chilled meat compartment is colder?)

I tried searching Google already, but all I ended up with were pages of replacement parts, repair instructions, and a few spammy links. Sadly, there was nothing truly informative. So here I am.

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I assume you either don't have the manual or its not useful. Could you post a picture? –  derobert Feb 22 '13 at 14:40
    
Suggest you stick a refrigerator thermometer in there. If it is radically different from the main refrigerator temperature you will know; if it is not, you can just use it for convenience. –  SAJ14SAJ Feb 22 '13 at 19:56
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Humidity varies too, so even if it's the same temperature, it might not be as good for vegetables if it's more open. That said, I wouldn't be surprised if it's not much different from the rest of the fridge, though, and is just a gimmick/convenience for small stuff. –  Jefromi Feb 22 '13 at 23:03

1 Answer 1

I believe that "snack drawers" tend to be the same temperature as the rest of the refrigerator and really just exist as a place for you to corral small items/kid-friendly foods. I know some people that put pudding, cheese sticks, etc. in their snack drawer without issue.

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