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Making gravy per usual is a by-product of roasting or pan-frying something. At that point, you take whatever jus you have in the dish and that essentially determines how much real gravy you end up with after you've de-glazed, added stock/water, flour, etc.

Looking for a method that results in more gravy (jus?) without wasting more meat/food. I'm assuming certain cooking temperature/method/meat results in more jus and gravy. That's what we're after here.

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most people don't just take whatever jus is in the dish. They add water or stock, deglaze the roasting dish with that, then add more water or stock till they have the volume they want, adding assorted fake "bouillon" flavours (stock cube, bovril powder, liquid bovril etc) to boost the flavour back up if it ended up too diluted. –  Kate Gregory Feb 23 '13 at 21:26
    
@KateGregory that's the point, how much jus you have after you've de-glazed determines the real gravy volume. Cheating with fake bouillon and extra water/roux or buying the gravy powder is what we're trying to avoid. –  MandoMando Feb 25 '13 at 19:30
    
I make delicious gravy all the time without fake bouillon cubes though I do add water and deglaze with it, and I wouldn't call that cheating. I think if you added stock that you made yourself it also wouldn't be cheating –  Kate Gregory Feb 25 '13 at 19:32
    
@KateGregory Not doubting that you need to add water or stock. But if you're trying to make 10lbs of gravy, adding 9.5 lbs of water or stock doesn't work. More jus to start is needed. How to get that, is the question here. I updated the question, hopefully it clarifies. –  MandoMando Feb 25 '13 at 19:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you want more gravy you need to add more liquids and natural flavours.

Better if you have bone but . . . no bone:
Before you roast your beef sear it, so it has good colour when it comes out, deglaze the pan/baking tray with water/red wine/white wine or Madeira one of me faves and put that to one side. (in the gravy stock pot)

Add onions, carrots and parsnips in with the beef, and touch of water, olive oil and salt. Don't go mad with the water you're not poaching the beef!! Just enough to stop the veg burning - 5mm in the bottom (top up if needed).

When the beef is ready (55C internal temp = medium rare more here) take it out of the tray, put the root veg to one side and and add the remains to your gravy stock pot.

Sear the bottom of the roast with a little oil (it'll be a bit soggy from sitting in the veg) then put it aside to rest (5-10 mins if you're in a hurry 15-30 for 3kg will come out lush!) deglaze again adding the resulting jus to your stock pot, which now had a wealth of flavour.

Use that stock pot to create a beast of a gravy! Make it in the usual manner, if you keep the onions in they'll make it thicker and tastier - a stick blender with give you a smoother texture if that's what you like!

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Anything that would increase the pan drippings would require the moisture to come from somewhere ... such as heating the meat too far, so that it becomes tough and dry (squeezing the moisture from the roast).

It won't help when cooking the roast this time, but if it's bone-in, you could take the bones to make stock for use in your next roast.

You could also add other ingredients to provide moisture; I generally roast meats on top of a bed of carrots and onions, and the onions release quite a bit of liquid.

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So, use end-cuts and bones? that seems to be the route. I agree with use of the vegetables, that should be par for the course. –  MandoMando Feb 25 '13 at 19:32

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