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All the recipes I've got for chocolate mousse say among the ingredients: heavy cream or heavy whipping cream. I would like to know the difference if it exists.

I'm from Venezuela; what other ingredient can replace these for this recipe or any recipe that needs this cream?

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marked as duplicate by SAJ14SAJ, rumtscho Mar 19 '13 at 17:15

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Welcome to the site, and good question! I think this may be fully covered by this previous question about cooking terms in various English dialects - the various types of cream are listed with fat contents, so as long as you know the fat content of the cream you can buy, you'll know what to do. –  Jefromi Mar 19 '13 at 16:13
    
Thank for your tip –  Marysol Mar 19 '13 at 16:35

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

The percentage of milk-fat determines the name. It is different from region to region.

In the US, heavy whipping Cream is above %36 fat. You can see this chart for the naming convention and fat content. For a chocolate mousse you're generally looking for cream with fat contents between %30 and %40. Otherwise you can get a phase-inversion in your mousse emulsion (it break or collapses).

  • There are Chocolate mousse recipes using butter instead of cream. It makes for a slightly different tasting chocolate mousse, but hey, it's chocolate mousse.

  • You may be able to cheat using an emulsifier such as soy lecithin to keep the emulsion stable. Gelatin does thicken things, but you're likely to lose the air bubbles in the mousse and get a denser mix.

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Thank you was helpful response! –  Marysol Mar 19 '13 at 16:47

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