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Does anyone have ideas to make fat-free or low-fat whipped "cream" in a whipped cream dispenser (I have an iSi one)?

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What is an ISI? –  Jay Mar 28 '13 at 21:11
    
It is a brand of whipper. –  vmingp Mar 28 '13 at 21:17
    
Should the manufacturer's instructions not tell you this, then? –  SAJ14SAJ Mar 28 '13 at 21:22
    
What're you trying to do with it? You can't in general make whipped cream even with half-and-half, so while there might be some wacky ways you can make some kind of low-fat milk foam, it's not going to taste or feel like whipped cream. –  Jefromi Mar 28 '13 at 21:40
    
add gelatin and keep it cold –  Brendan Mar 28 '13 at 21:54

1 Answer 1

There are any number of combinations of hydrocolloid agents that can be used to simulate the viscosity and other properties of dairy cream without the fat or even the dairy. "Modernist Cuisine" by Myhrvold includes a recipe for low fat "cream" which combines skim milk with l-carrageenan, cellulose gum, and whey powder; as well as a recipe for non-dairy whipping cream made from water, cellulose gum, proplene glycol alginate, agar, vegetable oil, and glycerin flake. Other recipes are less complicated with only a single agent such as agar or xanthan gum

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Hah, was just watching Nathan's lecture looking for this. Nice. –  MandoMando Mar 29 '13 at 1:27
    
You can also buy fat free "half and half" that's made with those kinds of ingredients (I remember it at least has carageenan anyway) - I'm sure someone out there is making "cream" too, though as long as they're thickening artificially, the "half and half" may be thick enough already. –  Jefromi Mar 29 '13 at 6:05
    
Thank you so much Didgeridrew - I can't wait to try the Low Fat Whip Cream with xanthan for my Easter dessert! –  vmingp Mar 29 '13 at 18:42
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@Jefromi i've tried the half and half with those ingredients and they aren't present in high enough concentrations to make a difference for whipping. They are primarily added to make up for the mouthfeel of the product since there is less fat. –  Brendan Mar 29 '13 at 20:18

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