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A cookie recipe asks for:

14 ounces good-quality thawed frozen puff pastry, such as Dufour

So, does puff pastry mean this? http://nishamadhulika.com/baking/homemade-puff-pastry-recipe.html

Secondly, how long do I have to freeze that stuff?

Thirdly, Google says that "thawed" means "Become liquid or soft as a result of warming".
So, what is the way to make it soft?
Do I have to add warm water and crush it?
Or do I have to heat it in an oven?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

No, you don't have to freeze it at all.

The recipe you linked is indeed for puff pastry. It is rather tedious to create it, so it is available in supermarkets as a pre-fabricated food, just like pizza dough and other doughs. But it doesn't have a long shelf life in the fridge, so it is sold frozen. The recipe assumes that you will buy it frozen, and warns you to let it come to room temperature before you start baking.

If you are making your own, the end product can be used in cookies immediately. Just pay attention to follow proper technique and work with a very cold dough and butter while making the puff pastry. The link you posted probably explains it - if not, search for better instructions.

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You said: "and warns you to let it come to room temperature before you start baking." So, thawed here doesn't mean anything special? I don't have to do anything to the puff pastry after I buy it from the store? I just have to wait for it to get to the room temperature? –  TheIndependentAquarius Mar 30 '13 at 12:11
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Yes, if you buy it, you only have to wait. And "room temperature" was not a very well chosen expression. It is better to have it come to fridge temperature or a bit more, somewhere in the 10-15 degrees celsius range. Room temperature and above is actually too much for these fat-depending doughs. –  rumtscho Mar 30 '13 at 12:26
    
It is better to have it come to fridge temperature or a bit more, somewhere in the 10-15 degrees celsius range. Room temperature and above is actually too much for these fat-depending doughs. Thanks for following up. This is very confusing. I don't have a thermometer. Guessing might be wrong. Thanks anyways. –  TheIndependentAquarius Mar 30 '13 at 12:29
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You want to feel flexible and easy to roll out, as this dough is very sensitive to the temperature of the fat. –  SAJ14SAJ Mar 30 '13 at 13:34
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