Take the 2-minute tour ×
Seasoned Advice is a question and answer site for professional and amateur chefs. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I bought a set of three Magnalite anodized fry pans(used) and was told they needed to be cleaned out and re-seasoned. What would be the best way to remove the old seasoning?

share|improve this question
2  
Are you sure this is anodized aluminum? Anodized aluminum pans are not normally seasoned. –  SAJ14SAJ Jun 24 '13 at 23:07
    
@SAJ14SAJ From here: "1. Any Magnalite Professional pan which is used for sauteeing or frying should be pre-seasoned when new and never cleaned with abrasive cleaners of any kind." –  belisarius Jun 25 '13 at 1:38
    
Ebay? Wow. My experience with anodized aluminum is with Calphalon, which definitely does not need to be seasoned. –  SAJ14SAJ Jun 25 '13 at 2:05

1 Answer 1

If you mean that the anodization has chipped and you have bare metal showing through, the best way to remove the remaining anodization is by sandpaper and lots of time/ effort (aluminum oxide, a.k.a. corundum/ ruby/ sapphire, is one of the compounds used in sandpaper, so it's sort of like grinding a diamond with another diamond). You could also likely dissolve it with concentrated acids or alkali, but these may also destroy the pan in the process, and I do not know that I would want to do that to cookware.

The most challenging problem lies in how to put the anodization back on (very controlled re-oxidation of the surface), without a large vat of hazardous chemicals or investing more money than the pan is worth having it commercially re-anodized.

share|improve this answer
1  
There is absolutely no sane reason to want to remove the anodization layer, and even if you could try to abrade it away, it is so much harder than the normal metal beneath that anything you could use to sand the anodization would absolutely shred the normal metal, destroying the surface of the pan. –  SAJ14SAJ Aug 22 '13 at 13:28
    
Agreed, the remaining anodized coating is harder than the base metal, but the question was how to remove the coating and "re-season". From a technical standpoint this is a correct answer. –  RudyB Aug 23 '13 at 1:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.