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What kinds of milk are low in carbs? I have heard about coconut milk but I'm not sure what's best.

PS: I am from India, maybe someone might want this info:-)

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Meta on close vote: meta.cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/1771/… –  SAJ14SAJ Jul 29 '13 at 13:54
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Nutrition is off topic here - we won't discuss what you should drink as part of any given diet. But the question of carb contents of various milks and milk replacements are (marginally) on topic. So I've edited your question to give you a chance. Feel free to edit further or roll back if you're not happy with it. –  Jefromi Jul 29 '13 at 15:11
    
How do you define "low in carbs"? –  baka Jul 30 '13 at 19:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Non-sweetened almond milk is probably what most people on low carb diets drink, when they drink it. It has < 1g of carb per cup.

Personally, I completely stopped drinking milk because of carbs years ago and I don't look back. I only drink a little bit of half and half with coffee, and even though it still has carbs, it's so little that it makes little difference.

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Almond milk has 4% carb, and 5% fat, same as cows milk more or less –  TFD Aug 1 '13 at 10:14
    
Just from some quick research, unsweetened almond milk seems to be a lot lower in carbs than dairy. Almond, Dairy –  sourd'oh Aug 1 '13 at 19:28
    
Are you getting carbohydrate percent (per 100 g) or the RDI figure? –  TFD Aug 2 '13 at 12:00

Cows, goat, soy, almond, and coconut milk have around the same carbohydrate levels, so there is not enough difference to make the effort to rework recipes etc.

Also coconut milk has more than 20% fat compared to milk having 1% to 5%. A normal human body can convert fats to sugars very efficiently (around 70%), so total energy of coconut milk will be very high

Approximate carbohydrate %, and kJ per 100 g of milk

Each country, recipe, and supplier will have different figures, these are standardised with Wolfram Alpha, a recognised accurate source, and a neutral source, as they are not involved in the food or dietary industry

In many countries, "standard" milk is homogenised half fat milk, so about half way between skim and full cow milk figures

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Whether or not it makes any sense, it's probably best to stick to the facts about carb content (as opposed to caloric content) - it's what the question is about. –  Jefromi Jul 30 '13 at 15:09
    
I cleaned up the health related discussion, especially seeing that the claim which caused it has been edited out of the answer. –  rumtscho Apr 9 at 22:41

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