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Following the catalog instruction I simply put ingredients into bread machine. However, when I got the dough, it contained particles of yeast.

Then, I decided to dissolve the yeast into water (as an ingredient) before adding to the mixture in bread machine. In this method, I found that the dough rises less.

What is the best way to mix ingredients for bread machine recipe? Is it helpful or harmful if briefly mixing the ingredient to be sure about dough consistency or it is better to leave everything for the bread machine?

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You should always read and follow the directions of your particular bread machine, and use recipes designed for bread machines. –  SAJ14SAJ Aug 3 '13 at 15:23
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@SAJ14SAJ If I understand right, "catalog instruction" means the bread machine's manual. Is that right, All? –  Jefromi Aug 3 '13 at 15:27
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Most bread machines specify a layering of the ingredients so that they mix thoroughly.... that is more specific than simple putting in the ingredients. –  SAJ14SAJ Aug 3 '13 at 15:29
    
@Jefromi yes it is manual, but it simply instructs to add ingredients to the machine, no instruction about layering or something like that. The manual mainly contains recipes (ingredients and their amounts), and the machine specifications and description. –  All Aug 3 '13 at 15:38
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...then put all the flour in a heap in the centre of the pan; make a hollow in the centre of this heap, put the yeast in this hollow. Then set the timer. Another tip: if you put the pan on a kitchen scale while adding ingredients, and you press "tare" on the scale after each ingredient, it's much easier to weigh everything. (Only applies if you use ingredients by weight, of course.) Lastly, experimenting with amounts that differ from the recipe may greatly improve your bread. It depends on the machine. I also found that the "French" setting on the machine (longer baking) gave the best crust. –  Cerberus Aug 3 '13 at 15:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Some (many) bread machines don't mix well, so you might not get a good mixture whatever you do. But it's worth trying.

If you are making the bread immediately after adding the ingredients, it probably doesn't matter much how you add the ingredients; just put the yeast and the sugar and such in the centre.

If you use the timer, it is important that the yeast stay dry up until the moment the machine starts mixing. What gave me the best result is this:

  1. add water, sugar, salt, egg, fat;
  2. mix this by moving the pan around until the ingredients are mostly dissolved (or stir with a wooden implement);
  3. then put all the flour in a heap in the middle of the pan;
  4. make a hollow in the centre of this heap, put the yeast in this hollow;
  5. then set the timer.

Another tip: if you put the pan on a kitchen scale while adding ingredients, and you press "tare" on the scale after each ingredient, it's much easier to weigh everything. This only applies if you use ingredients by weight, of course.

Lastly, experimenting with amounts that differ from the recipe may greatly improve your bread. It depends on the machine. I also found that the "French" setting on the machine (= longer baking) gave the best crust.

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the bread machine doesn't mix for very long. For the yeast, however, use bread machine yeast which has much finer granules and dissolve faster in the water.

If you are planning to set the timer on the bread machine, keep the yeast away from the water as cerberus explains.

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