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Fact #1: A lamb is a baby sheep.

Fact #2: I was watching a cooking show today, and one of the ingredients available was referred to as "baby lamb".

I'm a bit confused as to what "baby lamb" is. I don't think there are "degrees" of "baby-ness"; the sheep is either a baby (a lamb) or it's not. I considered another definition of "baby", as in "baby vegetables", where the item is just smaller than normal. But the pieces of lamb that were indicated didn't look especially small. They just looked like normal meat.

So... What differentiates normal lamb from "baby lamb"? I'm stumped.

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Maybe they were just being weirdly cute? –  JasonTrue Aug 30 '13 at 22:52
    
@JasonTrue Maybe, but he was speaking pretty seriously when he said it. It was on Masterchef UK: Professionals, and he was listing all the other ingredients in a normal voice. I thought there was something to it, but maybe not :) –  WendiKidd Aug 30 '13 at 22:54
    
Fact #1 revised: a lamb is a young sheep. This is equivalent to "what's the difference between a kid and a baby kid". –  Jefromi Aug 30 '13 at 23:22
2  
@Jefromi No, we're talking about sheep here, not goats. –  Kareen Aug 30 '13 at 23:34
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

According to Britannica:

The meat of sheep 6 to 10 weeks old is usually sold as baby lamb, and spring lamb is from sheep of five to six months.

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