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I want baking my own bread loafs, specially things like sourdough baguettes, ciabatta, flatbead, and multi grain loaf bread.

I've been researching this for a few days, but as usual, there is a tremendous information overload, and I'm not sure if/which book I should get, or is there an online place that would have me better covered.

I'm the kind of person that do actually enjoy knowing the whys and hows of how things work, but I also appreciate quick recipes, so a mix of those two would be great!

Is there any specific book/author/resource that you recommend?

Thanks!

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Mien, rumtscho Oct 17 '13 at 10:09

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Hi Francisco, book suggestions are generally considered off-topic across the network, sorry. You can get some advice in our chat room, The Frying pan. –  rumtscho Oct 17 '13 at 10:10
    
A bit of discussion of bread books in the chat room: chat.stackexchange.com/transcript/message/11739134#11739134 –  sourd'oh Oct 17 '13 at 21:03
    
Hey, sorry I know this is kind a very subjective question, but I was just hopping to see if there was a kind of "universally accepted" resources, the GOTO book that everybody agrees (to a degree) that is a good resource. Thanks for the Chat link though! –  Francisco Noriega Oct 18 '13 at 0:56

1 Answer 1

How about a good website? http://www.kingarthurflour.com/ Be aware that the brand of flour that website stresses measures and behaves slightly differently than other brands of flour, but they are usually interchangeable. In other words, a recipe on that site will always say such and such amount of a particular type (bread flour, all-purpose flour, whole wheat flour) of King Arthur Flour. 99 times out of 100 another brand of the same type of flour will give the same results.

I love that the recipes convert from volumetric to weight with one click of the mouse. Also, the reviews are very helpful.

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