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Like me, there are probably a lot people on here that have a lot of cookbooks, but I find I keep coming back to the same 1 or 2 books to give me the basis of most of the stuff I cook.

For me, I find myself coming back to the Jamie At Home book and Jamies Italy but I'm interested to see what other cookbooks others have as their "go to" cookbooks?

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85 Answers 85

1080 Recipes, by Simone Ortega.

This is a classic of Spanish cooking that almost every mother gives to their children when they leave home ;-)

http://www.amazon.com/1080-Recipes-In%C3%83%C2%A9s-Ortega/dp/0714848360

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Ad hoc at home and the French Laundry by Thomas keller is the book I stick with

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Madhur Jaffrey's "Indian Cookery" (a newer edition of this) and a Danish book called "Mad" (eng: Food) from 1939.

I also frequently use "Reader's Digest Complete Guide to Cookery" for all those techniques and methods that I only need once in a while, but when I need them, I need them desperately.

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My all time favourite cook books are, in no particular order:

An Omelette and a Glass of Wine

and

French Provincial Cooking

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I love working with dough and baking my own bread and pastry. So my bible is Peter Reinhart's The Bread Baker's Apprentice. I use this book so often that I don't even bother to return it to my bookshelf anymore.

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The River Cottage Meat Book

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Got this on my amazon wishlist. I use the River Cottage Everyday book which is very good. –  Mark Davidson Jul 16 '10 at 21:22

Not a book, but Google is the one I use by far the most. I typically have a rough idea what to cook, do a google search to find recipes for inspiration and then make something with bits and pieces from various sources.

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The Boston Cooking-School Cookbook, aka. The Fannie Farmer Cookbook, but about the only time I check a cookbook is for baking, so this one comes out each year for christmas cookies, and when I feel like making bread.

Years ago I read How to Cook Without a Book, and I tend to be like @Fredrik, and check Google pretty often, although I also have a collection well over 100 cookbooks that I've gotten over the years. (I volunteer at my library processing donated books for sale, so I get the opportunity to snag anything interesting for $1; plus my grandmother's collection from when she moved into a nursing home, and I browse used book stores when I travel)

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Definitely the Joy of Cooking. It's not a convenience cookbook for people with busy schedules or low patience - the majority of recipes in there are geared toward flavour and not specialty diets or quick prep times - but at least 9 out of 10 recipes I try in there have near-perfect flavour and texture.

IMO, this should be in every cook's kitchen, even the ones that don't really use cookbooks. It has all the classic recipes, and you never know when somebody will ask you to make Chicken Kiev.

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+1. It's a great staple of any kitchen. Tons of very basic instructions for when a more complicated recipe something like "blanched potatoes" and you've forgotten how to blanch a potato. –  kubi Jul 18 '10 at 15:24
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I've actually found that the Joy of Cooking has led me astray more often than leading me to the right path. I leave it on the bookshelf and consult other texts. –  Daniel Bingham Sep 9 '10 at 9:53
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@Daniel: No book is for everyone, of course, but I'm curious to know some examples of this. The only recipes I tend to ignore in that book are the Asian ones; virtually everything else I've tried has been perfect (although I obviously haven't tried everything). –  Aaronut Sep 9 '10 at 14:20
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I've tried a number of recipes from that book, and about the only one I found to be good was the alfredo one. Which I frequently modify to spruce up. All the others were bland and flavorless. Or just boring. Or plain didn't work. I just had bad experiences with that book, and eventually stopped using it. –  Daniel Bingham Sep 10 '10 at 19:01

My favorites are:

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The New Best Recipe from Cook's Illustrated.

Just the right balance between recipes and discussion of technique. I always consult this book before cooking a new cut of meat for the first time.

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This is the best reviewed cook book of all time on Amazon.com. 'Nuff said... –  mike the mike Jul 19 '10 at 20:41

The Good Housekeeping cook book is a classic. Has all the basics such as how to make sauces to roasting beef.

The copy I have is my aunties which was published in 1953 and it lives in my kitchen.

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Alton Brown's I'm Just Here for the Food If I'm going to be using a technique I'm not 100% familiar with.

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I really like How to Cook Everything by. Mark Bittman

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I recently purchased The Professional Chef (Culinary Institute of America) as both a cookbook and a reference guide. Despite what the title suggests, it is filled with basic information about: identifying different vegetables, herbs, and fruits; explaining the cuts of meat, their purpose and origin; chapters on different basic cooking techniques such as grilling, roasting, baking, etc.

It has a wide variety of recipes and some excellent resources for someone learning to cook. The best part is that the book will continue to serve you well through more professional culinary endeavors such as starting a catering business, opening a restaurant, or just cooking a meal for family and friends.

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Diet for a Small Planet

I disagree with a lot of their activism, but their dietary facts are spot on. If you want to know how to eat healthy as a vegetarian, start here. (We're not vegetarians, but some of our friends are and we like to entertain with full meals.)

When my spouse was young, their family couldn't afford meat very often. This and Joy of Cooking were my mother-in-law's bibles for how to feed the family healthily during some rough spots.

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Alton Brown's "I'm just here for the food" is a great go-to if you need to look up a technique.

As far as recipes go, I've loved everything I've cooked out of two Jamie Oliver books. "The Naked Chef" and "Food Revolution". Both contain simple recipes that use fresh ingredients.

You also can't really go wrong with any book authored by Julia Child.

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Bittman's "How to Cook Everything." It's really great - simple and easy - plus you can get the whole thing as an iphone app for $4.99.

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Penguin Cordon Bleu Cookery is the one cookbook I would take with me to a desert island. Ok, maybe a desert island with a good organic greengrocer and butchers...

Perfect to find out exactly how to cook whatever classically; I seldom follow it to the letter, but always check it to find out the important basics.

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Along the lines of The Joy of Cooking - you must have I Know How to Cook. It's originally in French, recently released in English.

If you can, get the older French editions before they've messed with all the recipes.

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Out of all the cook books, the one I keep coming back to is the book my mum bought me when I got married 20 years ago.

The book is Leith's Cookery Bible, and I like it because it covers a good sampling of different cuisines, recipes and cooking styles. There are a ton of basic recipes that you will make time and time again.

A cheaper version exists here and here (if you are in the UK).

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My favorite cookbook of all time and the one I've been returning to for a decade is Extending The Table.

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The Cook's Companion by Stephanie Alexander is considered the Australian cookbook bible.

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For Italian food my Italian copy of Science in the Kitchen and the Art of Eating Well is my first port of call; the Granddaddy of Italian cuisine.

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Seconding the recommendations for How to Cook Everything and The New Best Recipe, and I have to add How to Cook by the writer and TV presenter who taught millions of Brits: Delia Smith. It's the third hefty, indispensable volume on my cookbook shelf.

But if I had to keep only one, it'd be How to Cook Everything — it's ridiculously exhaustive. Not just a recipe book (though it's certainly that, and in a big way), but an encyclopedia of practical cookery. It's been invaluable as I learn my way around the kitchen and the grocery aisles.

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Slightly off topic as they don't really have many recipes in but I find the following three reference books really valuable...

On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen - by Harold McGee

Really useful reference book about cooking processes and ingredients. Want to know why something is working or not working the way it is, or how to cook that mystery ingredient. McGee is your man.

The Oxford Companion to Food - Alan Davidson

An encyclopedia of food knowledge, ingredients and gastronomical history. Very down to earth and well written too.

Larousse Gastronomique

If you want to learn about classic European cooking this is the book to have. All of those classic techniques and gastronomy in one book. Lots of recipes as well.

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Although, often Larousse isn't practical if you aren't running an estate kitchen. Look at the recipes for Demi-glace, or even stock. ... Start with one cow, one goat, hindquarters of a deer, 2 pigeons, one incontinent, three legged chicken... –  Chris Cudmore Oct 12 '10 at 13:51

I always seem to come back to the cookbooks written by Giada de Laurentiis. Giada's Family Dinners has a lot of my family's favorite recipes.

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