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Indian recipes call for using Maida or All-purpose flour in making samosa. Disregarding for a second the difference between the two (as discussed in here - Difference between Maida and All purpose flour), is it possible to use "regular" white refined flour instead of all-purpose one?

To clarify - I live in a country (Israel) where it's not possible to get Maida. Until now I have bought what is called all-purpose flour for samosas, but actually what is sold here as "white flour" seems to have similar nutritional content (All purpose flour has 10.4% protein, while white flour has 10.5% protein, similar calories and fat values). The reason I would like to use white flour is because it is 30% of the price of all-purpose flour.

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Isn't white flour the same as all-purpose flour? –  Mien Feb 27 at 12:56
    
@Mein It's confusing. In India (and therefore also on its exports) maida is sometimes labeled "all-purpose", but it is more like what Americans call cake flour. Israel has its all-purpose, which is less processed than the all-purpose in the US. What is called cake flour in Isreal would be called self-rising flour in the US. What Isreal has that is the closest to what Americans call all-purpose is called white flour. –  Jolenealaska Jun 24 at 3:57

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There has been quite a bit of confusion here concerning maida (which can be labeled all-purpose, especially in India). The top answer on the question that you linked to was actually incorrect. It has been fixed. Maida is actually a very low protein flour, much like what would be called cake flour in the US. I suspect and would appreciate if you can confirm that your use of the term "all-purpose flour" stems from the Indian use of the term, not that your recipes call for what Americans would call "all-purpose flour".

maida

In answer to your question, yes, you can substitute what you know as white flour and what I know as all-purpose flour (`10.5% protein) for maida by replacing some of the white flour with cornstarch or potato starch. The best reference I could could find for the percentage of protein in maida was The Fresh Loaf, they say that, on average, maida contains 7.5% protein. To get from 10.5% protein to 7.5% protein, you would need to "lose" 3 grams of protein per every 100 grams of flour. By replacing 28.6 grams of white flour with potato starch or cornstarch, your mixture would have the the 7.5% protein content of maida. That looks good on paper, but my gut says to split the difference. I'd first try a mixture of 15 grams of potato or corn starch and 85 grams of white flour as a substitute for 100 grams of maida. The use of cornstarch in that way is commonly done in the US with our all purpose flour to emulate our low protein cake flour. cake flour with corn starch

In case the international flour terms aren't complicated enough, I understand that in Israel what is generally called cake flour has added leavening agents, it's like what I would call self-rising flour. Confused yet? I'll repeat here what I said in comments above:

"It's confusing. In India (and therefore also on its exports) maida is sometimes labeled "all-purpose", but it is more like what Americans call cake flour. Israel has its all-purpose, which is less processed than the all-purpose in the US. What is called cake flour in Isreal would be called self-rising flour in the US. What Isreal has that is the closest to what Americans call all-purpose is called white flour."

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Great comment, thanks! I will try both adding cornstarch, or simply looking for a low protein percentage flour. –  dan12345 Jun 24 at 9:18
    
@dan12345 After the hours of research I put into understanding maida, it galls me no end to say this, but follow this question: cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/45167/… Something strange is afoot. –  Jolenealaska Jun 27 at 23:39

You should be able to use a high protein white flour as a substitute without too much issue. White bread flour would probably be best.

Do you plan to bake or fry your samosas? If you plan to fry you could use wonton wrappers instead, it's what all the restaurants do. Saves loads of time, and they get very crunchy.

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Why should the OP use a bread flour in a recipe which orignially calls for all purpose? –  rumtscho Feb 27 at 14:46
    
Maida is a "strong" flour, with a high amount of gluten. –  GdD Feb 27 at 15:01
    
Wikipedia says that it is actually a weaker flour, resembling cake or pastry flour. The linked question is such a mess, with answers and comments contradicting each other, than I wouldn't use it for anything. Do you have a reliable source on maida gluten content? (I admit that I don't trust Wikipedia too much either). –  rumtscho Feb 27 at 15:07
    
@gdd ACcording to wikipedia, Maida is more akin to cake flour, which of course is low protein. Is that article misleading? –  SAJ14SAJ Feb 27 at 15:07
    
@GdD I assume you mean eggroll wrappers? –  dan12345 Feb 27 at 16:14

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