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Is there anyway to raise the setting and melting point of gelatin so that it doesn't melt at room temperature. I've heard that adding pectin can raise the setting and melting point, but I'm no sure. Thanks.

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Where do you live that it is hot enough to melt gelatin at room temperature? – SAJ14SAJ Mar 12 '14 at 19:00

3 Answers 3

The melting (and setting) temperature of gelatine depends on the grade of gelatine. As per Wikipedia:

Gelatin gels exist over only a small temperature range, the upper limit being the melting point of the gel, which depends on gelatin grade and concentration (but is typically less than 35 °C) and the lower limit the freezing point at which ice crystallizes. The upper melting point is below human body temperature, a factor which is important for mouthfeel of foods produced with gelatin.

I would suggest experimenting with adding Agar to the mix, as Agar has a melting temperature of 85 °C, and sets at between 32 and 40 °C (again, as per Wikipedia

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but be careful if you're dealing with acids -- I found out the hard way that Agar won't set anything that's even slightly acidic. (ph < 6.8) – Joe Mar 12 '14 at 20:41
Agar certainly has a much higher melting point than gelatin, but it's an altogether different additive... I don't think that simply combining a little with gelatin is going to give you gelatin with a higher melting point. It's going to give you gelatin and agar. – Aaronut Mar 13 '14 at 1:39
Hydro colloids can frequently be combined to form synergistic systems, but the results aren't the sum of their parts. – SourDoh Apr 11 '14 at 21:41

I have tried a variety of additives to gelatin in a range of blends and unfortunately, nothing seems to significantly increase the melting point. The additives I have tried include: agar, glycerin, corn starch, pectin, sugar, and corn syrup.

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I would not "add" agar - I'd simply switch from gelatin to agar (or agar-agar if that makes it easier to spot at the store.) I personally find the powdered version easiest to measure/work with, but be aware that it also comes as rather large "sticks" that look somewhat like a clear dried noodle.

It's not a direct substitution - I generally use somewhat less agar than gelatin, and too much agar can be unpleasant, so some experimentation is probably called for when switching.

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