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Having recently invested in an airfryer, I was wondering if it would be suitable for roasting coffee beans?

The model I have is this one and goes up to 200C.

Has anyone attempted this with any success?

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2 Answers 2

I haven't tried it myself, but I'm pretty sure that it would work. In general the temperature you need is between a 150 and 300 degree celsius, but the best way to find out is to try and see what works best for you. There are plenty of sites explaining how to roast coffee beans at home, even with less "advanced" gear (popcorn makers, ....).

There are a few things to be careful about: You are working at high temperatures and the airfryer is not built for roasting coffee, so you shouldn't leave the fryer alone! You should be aware of the strong smell that roasting coffee produces, I'm not sure if the coffee smell/taste (and I'm not talking about a fresh ground coffee's aroma) will affect the taste of other food you plan to fry. And last but not least, this won't produce very good coffee, since you don't have much control of the whole process.

Try: https://www.breworganic.com/Coffee/HowToRoast.htm http://www.sweetmarias.com/instructions.php

Good luck!

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I think that device will not get hot enough. For a medium roast you need to get up to around 220 ºC, and darker roasts require higher temps. (Those are the internal temperature of the bean — presumably the device itself would need to be a little warmer.)

Even if you could, I'm not sure you'd want to. Roasting coffee has a pretty distinctive smell and will leave a residue on the inside of the device. Plus, you don't want your coffee tasting like fried potatoes or whatever else you've been cooking in the fryer.

If you want an inexpensive way to start roasting your coffee, I recommend getting an air popcorn popper. (Preferably one you can dedicate to roasting.)

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