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My question is very similar to this one here How to boil potatoes for curry? I am trying to enhance the potatoes flavour by masking it's own natural flavour with as much spiciness as possible, however, no matter which method of cooking I choose, the flavour of the potatoes always come through better than the flavours of the masala blended around the pan. Is there any known preparation tricks that I may be missing?

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If you don't like potatoes, don't use them. –  SAJ14SAJ Mar 19 at 11:51
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I do like potatoes and I am not trying to get rid of the flavour of the potatoes, but to change the balance of flavours slightly. Right now, I don't get enough flavour from the masala on the potatoes and I wanted to learn how to change that balance. I know it's possible because restaurants and family can do better than I can. I wondered if it is a method of advanced preparation or technique. –  Goncalo Mar 19 at 14:45
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After reading Gary's answer, I had a thought. These potatoes you like better than your own - how deep inside does the spice flavor go? Is it possible that restaurants cut the potatoes into cubes, so you regard each piece as one bite and always have spice+potato in the mouth, while your own potatoes are cut larger (maybe sliced?) and you have to bite off pieces, and so have some unflavored center pieces? –  rumtscho Mar 20 at 13:33

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There's a couple of pieces here: preventing getting the flavour in; and how to flavour them.

The structure of a potato is quite dense and contains a lot of dry matter. It's also protected by starch, which in a cooked potato manifests as a gluey layer (I make that sound much more unpleasant than it actually is!). An easy win is to rinse off the excess starch. Place the potatoes under running cold water and keep rinsing until the water runs clear. This literally opens the floodgates to accept more flavour into the spud.

That said, the dense texture is still going to block out most flavourings. Order any aloo dish from an Indian restaurant, cut a potato in half and nibble at the interior. It will just taste of potato (no bad thing!). The flavour is all on the exterior.

Your best bet to impart flavour is to work on the coating. You should season your cooking water, and coat your potatoes in an oil-based flavouring afterwards whether it's roasted or fried. For example, after parboiling in salted water, you could have a garam masala-rich tomato gravy that they are then simmered in.

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Thank you Gary. I like your response and I think it is inline with what I have seen before! –  Goncalo Mar 20 at 18:39

Soups and other dishes with a lot of liquid tend to infuse the potato with plenty of flavor to 'mask' the natural flavor of the potato. You could also try blanching the potatoes beforehand to get rid of some of the surface extractions that would leech into the food you're putting the potatoes in.

Edit: The smaller pieces you cut the potato into, the less you will notice them on your palate. Also, strong spices like paprika, cumin, etc will often overwhelm the potatoes. Mix them with other veggies like Chayote and green/red bell peppers in a stir fry for a quick side dish.

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Now that's what I call constructive advice! I'll try the blanching suggestion. I have been trying the boiling in water with all the flavours I want in, but not luck.. :) –  Goncalo Mar 19 at 15:12
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I edited with a little more advice :) Also, don't simply boil them in water with flavours - but rather start treating the potatoes as you would pasta or rice in flavoured dishes. Don't try to flavor the potatoes, but do use them as the 'starch' in a flavourful dish. –  jsanc623 Mar 19 at 15:13
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Thanks jsanc623 :) –  Goncalo Mar 20 at 18:38
    
Sure thing Goncalo –  jsanc623 Mar 20 at 18:43

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