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I experimented by substituting all purpose flour with oat flour that I ground up myself from organic oatmeal for pasta intended for ravioli.

I used roughly 3 cups of oat flour : 4 eggs ratio, Kneeded it into dough, let it rest for 30 minutes before attempting to roll it in my pasta roller.

The problem is I couldn't get the texture right, plus the oat flour kept absorbing all the moisture and became dry, brittle and unrollable.

Adding more water made it too moist and sticky that I know it would get stuck in my pasta roller. Kneeding water or more flour into the dough made it eventually dry and brittle again.

The oat flour dough is like a weird sponge! I can't get the texture right.

What am I doing wrong?

I've made pasta from all purpose flour before and have not had this problem.

EDIT: Just experimenting because I had extra Oatmeal on hand. I don't have Gluten sensitivity.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Pasta relies on gluten development for its strength and structure. Only wheat and its close relatives have the necessary precursor proteins, glutenin and gliadin, from which gluten is formed.

You simply will not be able to make pasta from 100% oat flour using a recipe designed for wheat flour, as oats do not contain gluten (well, technically, its precursors).

If you desire a gluten free pasta, you should search for recipes specifically for that purpose. They are often bound together with xantham gum or other hydrocolloids.

If you are just looking for an interesting pasta as an alternative to the more traditional ones, you need to make sure you have enough gluten available to support the structure (and overcome the weakening that will come from using oat flour, which will physically interrupt the gluten strands). I would suggest making sure you are using high protein wheat flour (such as bread flour), and only substituting a portion (no more than say 25%, and you might want to start with smaller amounts to see how it works) with oat flour. I haven't tried this, so you will need to experiment to find a good balance between oat flavor, and the ability for the pasta to hold its shape and structure.

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If gluten sensitivity is not a problem, it should be possible to make a 100% oat flour pasta and add vital wheat gluten until it is 10 to 15% of the mixture. At least it works well enough for breads, so I assume that it will be good for pasta too. –  rumtscho Mar 24 at 12:57
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@rumtscho Ah, I never think of gluten as an ingredient in itself... –  SAJ14SAJ Mar 24 at 13:00
    
blog.khymos.org/recipe-collection is a fun starting point, but nothing oatmeal-ish there! –  TFD Mar 25 at 0:00

I second SAJ14SAJ but have my disagreement on oat flour vs all purpose.

Oats do have gluten and in fact 14% gluten so unless you are using a gluten free oat flour you should use similar amounts as you would whole wheat flour because of similar percentages.

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That is incorrect. Oats do not contain gluten except as incidental contamination from using the same equipment used to process wheat, barley or rye. –  Jolenealaska Jun 28 at 5:47
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They might be around 14% protein, maybe that's what you're thinking of? But unlike wheat, the protein isn't gluten. –  Jefromi Jun 28 at 7:21

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