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I've been trying to make a good, chewy cookie recipe for the last 4-5 months but nothing good ever shown up. I've tried countless recipes on the internet with no success. One thing that I noticed was that my cookie dough always looks different from the pictures or videos that I have found on the internet. My dough looks like ice cream, is wet, and really sticks to the scoop. Sometime when I scoop it up I can feel that it's very light, not dense. I have tried adding more AP flour in and it made my dough a little more stiff. I can roll it into a ball shape without any of the dough sticking to my hand.

Which one is the good dough?

These are the ingredients I use:

1 cup AP flour
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup white sugar
1 egg
1/2 tsp baking soda
pinch of salt
1/2 tsp baking powder
1 1/4 cup blended oat
123 grams butter

What is the best ratio between wet and dry goods?

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There are a great variety of cookie recipes with different types of doughs. Drop cookies are different than rolled cookies. Please provide more detail, such as the actual recipe and expected outcome, an the specific problem you are having with the specific dough. It is especially important to indicate if you are deviating from the base recipe in any way. –  SAJ14SAJ Mar 28 at 15:41
    
And what is a VDO? –  SAJ14SAJ Mar 28 at 15:42
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Please post more on the recipe and your techniques. Are you making any ingredient substitutions? –  GdD Mar 28 at 15:42
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If you want to learn how to design/alter cookie recipes in order to get exactly the quality you want, there are two nice, thorough sources I can suggest. The first one is the cookie chapter in Corriher's book Bakewise, the other one is The food lab's cookie article, sweets.seriouseats.com/2013/12/…. While I am not sure that you want exactly the kind of cookie he is describing, you can see how he arrives at the kind he wants, and repeat the process in your preferred direction. –  rumtscho Mar 28 at 16:17
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And, while this sounds silly, it does matter: what is the ambient room temperature where you bake? If you are one of those folks living with 30 C conditions, you are just going to get softer dough. –  SAJ14SAJ Mar 28 at 16:48

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