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While I like grey or dark breads from whole grain, some recipies simply call for a white bread with less own taste. For example when you have hummus or aioli, you want a parisienne or a pita bread but (if you are like me) no pumpernickel.

What is a slow carb or low carb bread without an intensive own taste that fits well with these dishes?

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2 Answers 2

In the US, a few national bakeries manufacture whole-wheat pitas that, while not as "neutral" as normal pitas, are more neutral than whole wheat bread.

Whole wheat bread can contain molasses or cane juice in order to mask bitterness, which can give it a strong flavor that's unwelcome. The whole-wheat pitas I've tried don't concern themselves overmuch with bitterness, and use ingredients like oatmeal flour and flax seed to give their product a more neutral taste.

I've got a package of "Joseph's Flax, Oat Bran and Whole Wheat Pitas" in my desk drawer as we speak - the texture is rougher and not as tender as a normal pita, and it's definitely more bitter, but when used as an accompaniment for soups, stews, hummus or grilled meat, it's more than acceptable. Each pita is 50cal, with 7g carbs, so definitely low-carb, but they are not slow-carb, as the main ingredients are wheat gluten and corn starch. The whole-wheat flour, flax seed and oat bran are used for flavor rather than as the main ingredients.

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Have you tried using gram or chickpea flour? You can get it at an Indian grocer. For pita, you could sub 50% or more of the regular flour and get a similar result. Its easy to work. For leavened doughs I would start with a 25% substitution and see how much more you could stretch it in future attempts. I've made chapati, tortillas and bread with chickpea flour. It gives a bit of a yellowish tinge but great flavor. Be careful not to over-salt tho.

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How would you use it? Replace a portion of the flour in the recipe? Substitute entirely? Any advice? –  sourd'oh Aug 7 at 16:22
    
For pita, you could sub 50% or more of the regular flour and get a similar result. Its easy to work. For leavened doughs I would start with a 25% substitution and see how much more you could stretch it in future attempts. I've made chapati, tortillas and bread with chickpea flour. It gives a bit of a yellowish tinge but great flavor. Be careful not to over-salt tho. –  Loki Aug 7 at 17:23
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This is good info. You should edit your answer to include it! –  sourd'oh Aug 7 at 17:59
    
Is that better? I'm really noob here so lemme get used to the formats and stuff... But thanks for the reply. –  Loki Aug 8 at 13:01
    
Yep, that looks good. Comments can get deleted, so it's always best to include all the important info in the actual answer. Welcome to Seasoned Advice! –  sourd'oh Aug 8 at 14:42

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