Take the 2-minute tour ×
Seasoned Advice is a question and answer site for professional and amateur chefs. It's 100% free, no registration required.

About once per month, my mother prepares chicken with rice and a currysauce with pineapple. I don't know exactly what the method of preparation is of the chicken because it's prepared by one of those traveling grilling trucks.

However, what I do know is that there is a small (like 2 cm wide and half a cm deep) cavity in one of the hips of the chicken that's filled with really tasty meat. The cavity is open on the inside and I think it's the best part of the chicken. It appears to be some kind of organ meat, but I'm not sure what exactly it is. I also don't have a picture of the meat, sorry.

What could this meat be?

share|improve this question
    
    
Traveling what now? Oh man. I want to go to there. –  Preston Fitzgerald Jul 28 at 19:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Those are the chicken oysters -- muscle meat, not organ meat. I'm glad you've learnt to enjoy them by intuition, as they are indeed a prized portion of the chicken.

Wikipedia tells me the French call this portion sot-l'y-laisse: "(only) a fool leaves it there", because it is little known, easily missed, and much prized.

share|improve this answer
1  
The French wiki article is actually really unclear: it mentions two definitions (depending on the dictionary), and is a little vague about what they are. This article cited as a source clarifies: one possible definition is indeed the oysters (which a "fool" could accidentally miss), and one is the tail section (which a "fool" could mistakenly discard as inedible). After discussing usage in the 18th century, it actually concludes that it must be the tail section, because the term is singular. –  Jefromi Jul 27 at 23:34
    
On the other hand, Wikipedia editors have decided that the English article about chicken oysters and the French one about sot-l'y-laisse are referring to the same thing, while also referring to them as huîtres de poulet (literally chicken oysters). I'm not sure what the modern usage in France is. (My very helpful wife is from Quebec.) –  Jefromi Jul 27 at 23:37

Well done.I didn't think anyone else knew that ! I am an ex professional chef,of 35 years. I have seen enough fowl to last a life-time. The oyster meat is indeed a tasty morsel....we used to rack up 'brownie points''to see who had 'earned' the right to eat them. Point of interest...You'll find the equivalent of the 'oyster' in other fowl,from the tiniest sparrow,to the biggest ostrich too,and just as tasty !

share|improve this answer
    
Do you by any chance know what that piece of meat is used for when the animal is still alive? Wikipedia doesn't explain it. –  Nate Kerkhofs Jul 27 at 13:39
1  
@NateKerkhofs They appear to be part of the back musculature, most likely used to adjust the bird's tail position to help it maintain balance. –  logophobe Jul 27 at 22:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.