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I recently bought the grinder attachment for my Kitchen-Aid mixer. I tried grinding some chuck steaks but it was tedious as I constantly had to clear out stringy tendon/gristle pieces (not sure of the exact term, sorry). They did taste decent however. Next I tried some top round. It ground easily but seemed to have less flavor.

What are the preferred beef cuts for grinding tasty burgers?

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FWIW... My favorite burgers are chuck roast and bacon, ground together. I cube and trim the roast first to get rid of any gristle, then just feed it into the grinder, adding in bacon as I go. Toss with salt, pat into shape, and grill... So if you're having trouble grinding, a minute spent with the knife prior to might be all you need. –  Shog9 Sep 13 '10 at 3:34
    
I don't think you need to clear out tendon/gristle, in my Kitchenaid they grind fine and add to the texture of the burger. Absolutely agree about the difference between chuck and round, as I tried grinding round for the first time today. Not bad but definitely weaker on flavor. –  J. Winchester Feb 6 '11 at 21:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

For burgers I buy 2-3 different cuts - usually some sirloin and the end of a tenderloin (fattier and cheaper) and whatever else looks good. Slice thinly and stick in the freezer for 20 mins or so before you start grinding. I then mix in some finely minced onion and garlic, salt, pepper and a little Worcestershire sauce (all optional and to taste) before grilling.

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I use Alton Brown's "Burger of the Gods" recipe when grinding my own burgers:

  • 1 part sirloin
  • 1 part chuck
  • salt

He uses a food processor and pulses the meat 10x after cubing it. This is much simpler than using the grinding attachment you use; I only use that for some sausages.

The sirloin gives you that rich beef flavor, and the chuck provides the needed fat so you have a juicy and tender finished burger. I find that when I'm making my own burgers I don't need or want things like onion or other fillers getting in the way of my beef.

You can also find this recipe on YouTube.

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I use the same recipe and can definitely attest to the perfect combination of flavor and fat! –  stephennmcdonald Aug 22 '10 at 5:00

I haven't tried it yet, but Burger Lab's "Blue Label burger" sounds great. Six ounces of sirloin, five ounces of brisket, 12 ounces of oxtail.

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Eye of round. Try to get a cut with as little graders ink as possible so you don't have to trim. Cut lengthwise into quarters and slide through the grinder. Mix a little in the bowl to distribute the fat a bit. Patty it up and grill, or freeze for later. I like Sweet Baby Ray's BBQ sauce and sharp cheddar cheese on a grilled bun. YUM!

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