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I'm talking about the one served on a parmesan crust bowl, but that's not all. Besides the parmesan bowl (they only showed the chef melting grated parmesan and then molding it), what kind of pepper did he use? What else do I need to know to make that?

For how long should I let the parmesan melt before I can mold it? Should I let it cool down a bit first?

It looked really good, and the B&W thing gave it a mysterious look, something like hiding the details from it.

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Do you have a link to the video in question? –  sarge_smith Aug 22 '10 at 21:44
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I think this is it: metacafe.com/watch/5048712/anthony_bourdain_rome –  JustRightMenus Aug 23 '10 at 0:44
    
I gave it a try, before getting the actual recipes from here. Instead of using grated pecorino, I put shavings of it. I didn't let it melt all the way, so it wasn't that creamy. Flavor was there and turned out delicious. Will try again, with all recipes I got here. –  Mig Aug 23 '10 at 11:42
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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Cacio e Pepe is a great traditional roman dish (I'm roman!).

The ingredients are:

  • pecorino cheese, 160g for 4 people (I use Pecorino Romano, but you can use an equivalent sheep (not cow) cheese).
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • olive oil (optional)

Boil the pasta in salted water.

In the meantime heat some olive oil in a pan.

Keep in a little bowl some pasta cooking water and drain the pasta about one minute before the suggested cooking time (it will continue the cooking in the pan).

Put the pasta in the pan and add the cheese and some cooking water, about two ladles (the starch will help to bind the cheese and make the sauce creamy), whisk for a minute. Add a lot of pepper.

Another way to do that is to whisk directly in an hot bowl (or in an hot dish, but it's a little harder), to use this methodology I suggest you to see this recipe, it's in italian but there are a lot of pictures (plus google translate).

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I'm accepting this one (although you don't explain how to make de pasta bowl) because the recipe is right here, no need to follow links. But the other answers are great as well. –  Mig Aug 23 '10 at 11:40
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You'll need 2 recipes:

  • Cacio e Pepe ... just do some searches for that dish, and you'll find a bunch of recipes.
  • Pecorino/Parmesan Cheese Shell. Try grating fresh Parmesan and sprinkling it over a silicone baking mat. While it's still warm, drape it over an upside-down bowl to shape it. Once it cools, I think you're all set. I plan to try this! EDIT: I'd only heat the cheese just until it gets melty... otherwise it'll stiffen up too soon.

Note: I have never made either of these... just trying to give you a starting place. In the video, I heard the guy say that the dish was called Cacio e Pepe, so I started hunting. It sounds great, though.

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Thanks, the pictures look really good =) –  Mig Aug 23 '10 at 11:40
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The cheese shell is called a frico. Here is a decent little video that shows you how to make it; simply drape it over a bowl as JustRightMenus says when you take it off the baking sheet.

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Sweet! I love the idea of using a muffin pan to shape the little cheese bowls. Talk about high presentation value, having uniformly sized little edible bowls. –  JustRightMenus Aug 23 '10 at 3:08
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