Take the 2-minute tour ×
Seasoned Advice is a question and answer site for professional and amateur chefs. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Today, I'll be getting about 50 lbs of fresh moose meat. I suspect, it'll be an assortment of different cuts.

What are some of the things to consider when cooking Moose?

share|improve this question
3  
Consider who you're going to invite to a moose cookout. –  Bob Sep 29 '10 at 14:01
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Since moose is always hunted the actual characteristics of the meat will vary. An old moose is tough moose.

It has a mild beef like flavor and can be used in recipes that call for beef. If it is a tough specimen then, as with tough beef cuts, stick with slow, wet cooking methods.

It is extremely lean. Some recipes, especially if using it as burger, may require adding some fat. Because it is so lean it works very well for jerky or smoking and that is my favorite use of it.

EDIT My favorite, all-purpose jerky recipe copied from the comment:

3 lbs. meat, sliced thin (partially freezing makes the slicing easy)
1 T salt
1 tsp garlic powder
1 tsp onion powder
1 T pepper (I like coarse ground)
1/4 c. soy sauce
1/3 c. Worcestershire sauce
1/3 c. liquid smoke

Marinate in the fridge for 12 hours and then drain and dehydrate.
share|improve this answer
    
I've cooked moose and deer steak before, and I agree with the toughness variation. In terms of making jerky, I know we're not supposed to ask for recipes on this site, but can you guide me ? –  dassouki Sep 29 '10 at 16:10
add comment

If I were to cook moose I would have to try it at least once in mole. Can't pass up the idea of having chocolate moose!

share|improve this answer
1  
...that was awful. –  daniel Oct 7 '10 at 19:36
2  
Yet awesome. +1! –  ceejayoz Oct 7 '10 at 22:11
    
meat mousse doesn't even sound good.. ick.. haha –  zanlok Dec 2 '10 at 23:39
add comment

Moose should be treated the same as venison: you either cook it very fast or very slow. Five minutes (dry and hot; steaks and loins) or ten hours (low and wet, any cut). Anything in between will be very tough.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.