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I decided to make some caramel rolls for treats for work and realized I only have one metal 9x13 pan. I have a couple 9x13 stoneware pans, but I've never used them for something like caramel rolls before.

Can I use the stoneware pans in the same way I'd use a metal pan or do I need to do something different to get the rolls to turn out well.

Thanks!

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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If your caramel rolls are the kind with a sticky, gooey mass in the bottom of the pan that is flipped upside down out of the pan, then I would say that the rolls won't really get good and caramely in a stoneware pan. You'd be better off baking one pan of rolls at a time in the metal pan. While one pan is rising and baking, just chill the other part of the dough... either plain in a bowl, or prepared into a log that only needs to be cut.

If the caramel rolls are more like a cinnamon bun, then the stoneware dishes should do fine in a pinch. This is assuming they are glazed stoneware and not terra cotta. Cooking time will increase a bit as the stoneware will take longer to heat up (it will also retain the heat longer when removed from the oven).

You could always just go out and buy some foil pans. I do that when I make rolls (caramel, cinnamon, and sticky) for the local fire company's carnival. They go through 17=20 dozen rolls each year.

I know baking rolls can be a lot of work, so what I have found to be very helpful, is to make the dough the night before baking. Cover with cling film, and let it have a slow rise in the fridge all night. (you will get improved flavor too.) The next day, divide the cold dough up and prepare as usual. They will take a little longer for the rise in the pan after shaping, but it sure is a lot easier on you.

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Grease the pans well and/or line with parchment, and start checking them sooner than you would the metal pans. They may actually take longer than metal, but you can always just choose to leave them in longer, while it's kinda hard to hit 'Undo' on an oven.

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