Take the 2-minute tour ×
Seasoned Advice is a question and answer site for professional and amateur chefs. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I made this recipe last week - chicken wings roasted in a marinade of soy sauce, brown sugar and white wine vinegar. It was delicious but lots of the marinade has burned onto my baking tray, and I'm struggling to get it clean.

I put it in to soak immediately, scrubbed and then tried washing powder, but it is still very firmly stuck on. Does anyone have any cleaning ideas that might help me in this case?

share|improve this question
2  
What is the pan made of? It makes a huge difference to cleaning methods. –  Marti Nov 9 '10 at 15:23
    
When you say washing powder, are you talking about supermarket stuff like Ajax or a specialty product like Barkeeper's Friend? –  Aaronut Nov 9 '10 at 16:14
    
@Aaronut, I actually thought "washing powder" = laundry detergent, so I was mightily confused. Thanks for the alternate interpretation. :-) –  Marti Nov 10 '10 at 2:40
    
No - I think you may have had it right Marti - I mean powder we put in our washing machine to clean clothes. –  Bluebelle Nov 10 '10 at 9:33
    
I have no idea what Ajax or Barkeeper's Friend are I'm afraid! –  Bluebelle Nov 10 '10 at 9:34
add comment

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Half fill it with water, then put in on the stove top over a medium heat. Work the burnt-on bits with a wooden spoon or spatula as the water starts to boil. You should be able to soften it up and be able to get it off then.

share|improve this answer
    
I do this with vinegar instead, just a little bit and it pulls everything up. –  Manako Nov 9 '10 at 17:22
    
This is working nicely, thank you! –  Bluebelle Nov 12 '10 at 10:38
    
@Bluebelle, great! did you go for just water or vinegar too? –  Sam Holder Nov 12 '10 at 14:55
add comment

There's not much to say about this: The only thing you can try is to use fat-resolving detergents. The rest that is really burnt to coal has to be removed physically by hand. No way around this, unfortunately.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Ammonia does a really nice job on pans with a lot of burn on black debris that won't come off with scrubbing.

  • Remove the bulk of the debris on the pan,(you're already there)
  • Then place the pan, and a container with some 1/2c(120ml) of household ammonia in a plastic bag.
  • Close up the bag (doesn't have to be totally air tight).
  • Leave it sit for several hours to a couple days.The burned on stuff will come off pretty easily.
  • Then wash the pan normally.

I strongly advocate letting the pan/bag combination sit outside or in a garage or very well ventilated room during the soaking phase.

This works great on broiler pans, but I have used it on other pans as well.

Do NOT use this technique on aluminum pans.

share|improve this answer
    
what happens if you use the technique on aluminum pans? –  Menachem Jun 10 '12 at 8:21
add comment

There is a special tool that I use for tough pot cleaning jobs. It is a small hard nylon square, with three curved corners and one more pointed corner. The edges are slightly beveled. I have several that came with my order of pampered chef bakeware. I think you might be able to buy them retail or online also.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Baking Soda and vinegar made to a paste, use paste to buff pot or pan with a soft cloth. Works like magic.

share|improve this answer
    
Works like water, which is exactly what you get when you mix those two. Separately, they work OK as cleaners; together, they make water. I guess if it's still pasty then you've got a little extra baking soda, which is equivalent to just a baking soda paste - the vinegar has been entirely neutralized before it hits the tray. –  Aaronut Feb 18 '13 at 3:57
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.