Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

78

Which acid works best to keep avocados from browning? Answer: None (of the acids tested) It's not that acid doesn't do much to help. ALL OF THE ACIDS TESTED CAUSED AVOCADOS TO BECOME MORE BROWN AND TO BECOME BROWN FASTER THAN NO TREATMENT AT ALL I am not kidding. Method For acid, I used freshly squeezed lemon juice, freshly squeezed lime juice, ...


21

Nice experiment. Oddly enough food scientists in Florida have looked into the same problem, and achieved results similar to yours: THE RETARDATION OF ENZYMATIC BROWNING IN AVOCADO PUREE AND GUACAMOLE Enzymatic browning in avocado puree and guacamole was evaluated by reflectance measurements for several varieties of avocado with varying amounts of ...


17

Ingredient substitution lists say you can use an equal volume of lemon juice or vinegar if you don't have cream of tartar. Most likely, the assumption has been that a baker will be more likely to have cream of tartar on hand than other acid sources due to the fact that it has multiple uses in the kitchen: Leavening Stabilization of egg whites Prevent ...


15

I'm culling a lot of information from one of my favorite cocktail books for this one. Yes, limes have a slightly higher acid content (on average) than lemons do - about 6% for limes, compared to 4.5% for lemons. More importantly for their flavor, lemons have about 2% total sugar, while limes have somewhere between 0.5% and 0.75%. Sugar/sweetness has quite ...


10

Litmus paper is quite inexpensive. Edmund Scientific has 100 strips for US$1.95.


9

Yes, it is a incorrect. The correct thing to say is that it reduces sourness. Sourness is a taste, and sweetness indeed reduces it, and vice versa. Coca Cola classic has the same pH as vinegar, 2.5, but the cola is sweet and the vinegar is sour, because the sugar in cola is enough to compensate the acidity and push the taste into the sweet range. Acidity ...


9

Ceviche is not exactly "cooked", but the acid causes the proteins to become denatured in a similar way. It may not kill all bacteria and parasites as effectively as cooking (with heat), so like sdg said, it's safest to use food that you would eat raw. "Sushi grade" can refer to the fat content of the fish (like the USDA grades for beef marbling) rather than ...


9

I'd like to refer you to my answer to the question about chili in cast iron, from which I'll summarize the relevant parts: Typical cast iron corrodes at a pH lower than 4.3; pure white vinegar (5%) has a pH of 2.4 and wine is around 3.2 to 3.8. If you plan to use either of these in cast iron, you'd better make sure they are heavily diluted, otherwise you ...


7

Hardly a queer question. We marinate in acidic liquids because it tastes good, really. As Alton Brown said in the Good Eats episode, "Raising The Steaks": "Acid doesn't tenderize meat nearly as well as enzymes. But acids can help you tenderize your own food. That's because acids taste tangy, and tangy tastes tell our saliva glands to do their stuff, and ...


6

According to this neat chart on Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:PH_Scale.svg Lemon juice is around 2, and baking soda around 9. Our digestive juices are around a 1, so it's probably safe to go a bit less than 2, but you wouldn't enjoy it. Baking soda is 9, and milk of magnesia is 10...both of which are safe to consume in small quantities, but I ...


6

You can neutralize the acidity of your drink by adding a half teaspoon of baking soda, but don't do this. Apart from fizzing up like a volcano, your lemon drink, or what is left of it, will taste pretty awful. What you want to do is reduce the perceived acidity. This can be done simply by adding more honey. I suggest adding a teaspoon at a time until it ...


5

The major protein in cow's milk, casein precipitates at pH 4.6. It matters very little which acid you use to get to 4.6, casein will still precipitate. pH 4.6 is about the same acidity as canned beets, a food not known for its tartness, so you won't achieve a very sour flavor before things start curding up on you. Adding emulsifiers could help some with the ...


5

There's a bit of trickery going on in the comparison of vinegar (acetic acid) to spirits of salt (hydrochloric acid). Your 5% (0.83 molar) vinegar has a pH of about 2.5. You need much less of the stronger acid, HCl, to reach that same pH (2.5); in fact only 0.003 molar, a factor of 277 less. Since you taste the anion (acetate or chloride), not the proton ...


5

First, there are plenty of sour ingredients in Asian cooking, that are de-acidified by a little sugar. Tomato paste, peppers and soy are examples that come to mind. Second, and this is the Zen-style answer, is that the sugar is to sweeten the dish a little. One teaspoon of sugar in a sauce is plenty sweet enough, especially if you're not used to having 6tsp ...


5

TECHNICALLY, sweetness doesn't reduce acidity or change pH, but for practical cooking use, this is true. Sweetness changes how the food is perceived, reducing the impact of sourness or bitterness. Sourness will also reduce the impact of sweetness. To quote On Food and Cooking, page 655 "Sweetness helps mask or balance both sourness and bitterness from ...


5

Whether or not you should stick with a tested recipe depends on your expertise and the food in question. In this case, if you are an experienced chef, and the food you are preparing you would be willing to eat raw (i.e. sushi grade), then no worries, just go ahead and experiment. On the other hand, I tend to stick to a recipe pretty closely for the first ...


5

There is really no way to reduce the acidity in a marinade or sauce without creating undesirable flavor compounds. Adding a base would neutralize the acid but would also produce salts which don't taste so good. If you are making a marinade then simply add less acid to it, however if you are using bottled sauce then you have a few options to deal with the ...


4

I think it is mostly for the taste. It certainly isn't necessary - I roast beets without any vinegar all the time, and they turn out great. I just roast them in their skins, without any oil or anything added. It takes a long time, over an hour depending on how big they are. When they are completely tender, let 'em cool, and the jacket slips right off. ...


4

I don't think that word means what you think it means. mis·no·mer [mis-noh-mer] noun 1. a misapplied or inappropriate name or designation. Perhaps you meant "myth"? "urban legend"? "misapprehension"? As for sweets and acidity, it's correct that adding sugar makes a food seem less acidic without actually making it less acidic.


3

You neutralize acid by adding a base. Generally bases are bitter tasting. Black tea is a base, as is baking soda (sodium bicarbonate). The problem is that when you add an acid to a base you get salts. What we call salt is NaCL, which is just one example of a salt, there are many others, and those salts can add all sorts of undesirable flavor combinations. So ...


3

I don't have any info on the affect of pH, but cornstarch can make your compote separate when canned: http://www.sbcanning.com/2011/08/canning-pie-filling-education-in-clear.html. Two alternative thickeners are tapioca and clearjel. I've used clearjel for canning with excellent results. I haven't used tapioca to can, but do prefer it in my pies. (posted ...


3

Most bacteria in homes grow in biofilms. Like the whitish stuff that accumulates on your teeth during the day or slimy dirt on plugholes. A biofilm is a three-dimentional structure, usually made of polysaccharides, which protects the bacteria that are inside. It can even form quasi-differentiated structures, similar to fungi organs. Biofilms are extremely ...


3

Some jalebi can be dusted with citric acid to add tartness, but it really depends on the recipe. Jalebi itself isn't more than wheat and sugar, so chances are you're in the clear.


2

That's the first I've ever heard of roasting beets in vinegar. Acids will intensify the color of anthocyanins which are the red, purple, and blue pigments in foods. For instance, sauteed red cabbage will end up a blah blue color unless you incorporate some acid (red wine, vinegar, etc.) and then it will brighten right up to a bright red/purple color. ...


2

I'm not a chemist so I'll let wikipedia do it for me: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxidation As far as it's culinary effects in crusts- I have seen unreliable reference to the flour oxidizing and developing a off color. I have never seen this personally and I am skeptical of it. Pie crusts can be made just fine without vinegar. Vinegar does significantly ...


2

I'm going to post a very general answer to this, since the question is rather vague about the application. Since this was originally tagged molecular-gastronomy it seems reasonable to assume that this has to do with the use of some hydrocolloid for either a foam or gel. Unfortunately, it doesn't specify which one, and that's important information because ...


2

I think the issue with acid in iron is less what it does to the food and more what it does to the pan. You've spent all that effort building up and maintaining that beautiful seasoning, and anything strongly acidic like tomatoes or vinegar will strip that off.


2

My understanding is that you want to avoid all fairly acidic liquids in cast iron, out of concern that it will leach an undesirable amount of iron into the food and/or change the flavor or color of the food. A squeeze of lemon juice into a sauce? No problem. Braise for 30 minutes in a very acidic sauce? Not such a good idea. (Unless of course your Dutch oven ...


2

One thing you could do is reduce the amount of lemon juice, and add some lemon zest. This will give you much of the lemon aroma without so much acidity. Try adding some zest to the cooking and then grate a little more on the finished plates, just before serving. Use a microplane.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible