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8

A general rule-of-thumb is that a butterfat content of 30% or more is required to produce whipped cream. Half and half (called half cream in the UK), which is comprised of half milk and half cream has a butterfat content between 10 - and 12.5% butterfat, based on various sources discovered in my research. That being said, I've read that half and half can ...


8

McGee on Food and Cooking: An Encyclopedia of Kitchen Science, History and Culture will answer most questions on what the chemistry is behind most cooking processes, without being too academic.


7

The magic emulsifier is probably soy lecithin. According to Wikipedia: It is used commercially in foods requiring a natural emulsifier or lubricant. In the food industry it has multiple uses: In confectionery it reduces viscosity, replaces more expensive ingredients, controls sugar crystallization and the flow properties of chocolate, helps in the ...


6

This depends on what is in your bread improver. Cream of tartar is salt which acts as a buffer. If the bread improver also contains acid (ascorbic acid is sometimes an ingredient), it makes it harder to distinguish, because it will react similarly in many circumstances. The first simple test would be to add baking soda to a solution of each ingredient. If ...


6

Hey guys, since the question was posted they opened up Modernist Pantry, which specifically caters to this need. They supply chemicals for molecular gastronomy in consumer-sized portions. For $10 or less apiece, you can order small amounts of emulsifiers, gelling agents, foaming agents, etc. They also have spherification kits, the Texturas products, and ...


5

I'm not sure how helpful I can be but, at least coming from a chemistry lab background, I can say you might run into issues trying to buy food additives in such amount. Things like potassium chloride are easy to get because they have many uses outside of food and aren't really harmful unless you swallow the whole bottle. Many compounds are either obscure, ...


4

If cooled and stored properly (minimize air space in the container), most soups will should last in the refrigerator up to 5 days. Do you really want to be eating the same soup that long? I would suggest dividing your soups into smaller sized containers and freezing it so you have a wide selection available at any given time. Depending on the ingredients ...


4

See @Kryptic's answer as well. Just to supplement, if you are going to buy stuff from chemical suppliers, you want food grade chemicals. Pharmacopaedic grades (i.e. BP, USP, etc.) are also okay. and a bit of background information. you can get chemicals in different grades from manufacturers, e.g. analytical grade, reagent grade, etc. these are for lab ...


4

http://www.ukfoodguide.net/enumeric.htm The E numbers are standardized across all EU nations. I'm not even aware if non EU nations use them?


3

Alkaline solutions are added to wheat noodle dough when it is too be pulled by hand. The alkaline substance will break down the gluten connections to make a more pliable dough See What flour and technique do I need for hand pulled noodles?


3

The short answer is no, half and half doesn't have the fat content necessary. You will have to add something with high fat content. As stated above you could try adding some evaporated milk, or even clarified butter to bring up the fat content. Or a bit of heavy cream in it would bring it to a high enough fat level.


3

Basically you can't actually make soft-serve style yogurt in a regular freezer. It's just too cold. However, you can make it softer by doing one or more of the following: adding additional sugar. After a certain concentration, sugar prevents ice cream, sorbet and frozen yogurt from freezing as hard. Adding some concentrated source of alcohol. I often use ...


3

The viscosity of a xanthan solution is virtually unaffected by temperatures from freezing point to boiling point of pure water and it hydrates rapidly in cold water. You don't need to let it sit on its own and the temperature doesn't matter. The viscosity of a xanthan solution lowers when whisking or stirring, a process known as shear thinning. When you ...


2

BHA, BHT and/or TBHQ aren't added to the packaging to keep the cereal from spoiling. It's actually added to keep the box from spoiling. As you stated, BHA and BHT slows down the oxidization of fats and oils. It keeps them from going rancid. And while some of this preservative will migrate into the cereal, many cereals don't actually have any fats or oils. ...


2

Besides the points made by derivative and Michael, I noticed that it helps to mix the xanthan gum first with some other dry powder and to hydrate it by mixing it at very high speeds. When I use it in a salad dressing I mix well some sugar (5 times by weight) with the xanthan before pouring it into the food processor. The sugar separates the xanthan grains ...


2

Are you measuring your xanthan gum accurately, with a scale that goes down at least to tenths of a gram? The practical range of application is about 0.05% to 0.8% of the weight of the liquid. Much above that and it will be very snotty and unpleasant. You've got to measure it quite precisely if you want reproducible results. If you need a scale for modernist ...


2

Khymos has a list of suppliers on his web site organized by region. Most of those are more geared toward the molecular gastronomy additives (namely E400-E499), but some of them may sell other additives as well. Additionally, if the product you're looking for happens to be in the Texturas collection, you can have a look at Adria's list of distributors.


2

I didn't post a full answer before, because I didn't have the time to expand on one. Aaronut spared me time by writing 2/3 of what I would have (citric acid, citrate) and presenting it very well. I won't repeat that part. But there is another point which I find important: When you say "tangy", do you really mean "sour"? Because for me, "tangy" means a ...


2

Citric acid is available at many supermarkets worldwide, and if you can't find it in any of your supermarkets, you should almost certainly be able to find it in a bulk food, health food, or baking supplies store. As rumtscho helpfully points out in the comments, you can also find it online, i.e. on Amazon, but do make sure that it is actually food grade ...


2

I can think of adding alkali or acid substances mainly as means of changing the ph of the dough. And adding can be understood as in the dough, or on its surface. Alkali/basic additives or ingredients Gluten only works if PH is between 3 and 11. Outside those values it loses its stength. Before reaching PH>11 it will make flour have a higher absorption. ...


1

A mixture of sodium bicarbonate (which is alkaline) and tartaric acid is commonly used as a chemical leavener in baking. If flour is mixed with small amounts of these substances, then carbon dioxide gas will form when water is added to the mixture creating small bubbles in the batter or dough. The mixture is typically cooked as soon as possible after the ...


1

Some years ago I tried a lemonade in southern Peru. It was very tangy and creamy. I asked the waiter how they made it and he replied that they blended a whole lemon with its peel. The juice was then strained. It was g


1

Have you looked at your local bulk stores? A new one that doesn't cater to the organic-natural-whatever clientele opened up here. One of the bins in their spice area? MSG. Also, in this context, bulk means "Take however much you need out of the bin", not "Buy by the kilogram".



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