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42

You will never fully cook away alcohol, only reduce the amount. See Alcohol retention in food preparation, or for the quick table, see wikipedia. They covered this on an episode of America's Test Kitchen, and concluded that surface area matters -- a wider vessel would cook off more alcohol; it wasn't just a function of time.


38

Whisk(e)y has some crazy chemistry going on inside of it, due to the complex interactions between water, alcohols, oils, esters and other compounds of various complexity. The profile of these chemicals will vary between different whiskey/whisky styles, but the overall chemistry is similar. Simple effects of dilution Adding water, or serving on the rocks, ...


31

Liqueur is essentially a flavoured distilled spirit, with the important distinction of added sugar. Vermouth is not distilled, which is why it's referred to as a fortified wine. Flavoured vodkas usually have no added sugar, and so are not classed as liqueurs. Campari uses both distilled alcohol and sugar, and so is a liqueur. Have a flow chart: And a Venn ...


19

A study conducted by the US Department of Agriculture’s Nutrient Data Laboratory calculated the percentage of alcohol remaining in a dish based on various cooking methods. The results are as follows: Preparation Method and Percent of Alcohol Retained alcohol added to boiling liquid & removed from heat: 85% alcohol flamed: 75% no heat, stored ...


17

Here is a quote from the company that makes the registered trademark Baileys Irish Cream: Baileys® is the only cream liqueur that guarantees its taste for 2 years from the day it was made, opened or unopened, stored in the in the fridge or not when stored away from direct sunlight at a temperature range of 0-25 degrees centigrade. One of the keys to ...


13

I can't give you a list with good substitutes for common dishes. First, I doubt that my common dishes are your common dishes. Second, it would be too long. If you want to substitute alcohol in a dish, you have to understand what it does in the specific recipe, and then use your imagination to think of an ingredient which will have a similar effect. Alcohol ...


13

You could, of course, create gel layers, and the determining factor in stability would be the firmness of those gels. However - and I suppose this is just a hunch - I seriously doubt that a gel firm enough to hold the weight of all the heavier layers above it (and you are asking for at least 3) would really be drinkable, unless you're aiming for the ...


13

This is a kind of emulsion called the Ouzo Effect (ouzo and other aniseed drinks also do this). I won't pretend to know enough to explain it, but it's essentially down to how oils (like those in fruit skin), water, and alcohol interact when stirred or otherwise agitated. Wikipedia has an article that explains it fully.


11

I've been able to shake and strain cocktails with two cups pretty easily. Ideally one cup should be slightly smaller than the other, though this isn't absolutely necessary if you're careful. Put the open ends together and shake as necessary (if they're slightly different sizes as described, you can get a real nice seal and shake vigorously). Now, place ...


11

For white wine, try: chicken broth/stock vegetable stock white grape juice ginger ale canned mushroom liquid diluted white wine or cider vinegar For red wine, try: beef or chicken broth/stock diluted red wine vinegar red grape juice tomato juice canned mushroom liquid A great list of substitutions for cooking with various alcoholic ingredients may be ...


11

White wine in tomato sauces adds: Some acidity, but tomatoes are quite acidic as well A touch of fruitiness and flavor Alcohol, which does not all cook off, which can enhance the perception of the dish due to some flavor molecules being alcohol soluble, especially in tomatoes Since you are avoiding alcohol itself, some of the options you might use are: ...


9

If you add alcohol, some alcohol will remain indefinitely (or at least as long as the food is not a lump of smoking carbon). The proportion of alcohol to water-based liquids will shrink over time, however. (I'm assuming heat here: if there is no heat, or high pressure, then the proportion will remain stable for quite a while). Alcohol evaporates at about ...


9

Beer bottles should be stored upright. This is to minimize contact (and hence oxidization) between the beer and bottle cap, and (for unfiltered beers) to keep any sludge on the bottom of the bottles. (How To Store Beer) Wine should be stored (mostly) on its side. This keeps the cork moist; and a dry cork can shrink and allow too much air into the wine ...


9

No, it won't help you at all. Your vegetables aren't being eaten by bacteria or similar (and this is a good thing, foods which are rendered unsafe by bacteria shouldn't be kept more than 4 hours at room temperature). They are simply wilting. There is no way to stop the wilting process. It is the plant cells dying off and stopping being able to "take care ...


8

I'm not sure your introduction is a good summary of the answers on the question you linked to - it takes a long time to get rid of the alcohol, and a good amount of water goes with it. The liquid as a whole is boiling; it's not just the alcohol. This should make the answer fairly obvious too. If you're braising in a way that will leave most of the liquid in ...


8

The best nonalcoholic substitution that I can think of for a ruby-style port would be pomegranate or black cherry juice, something not from concentrate. The POM brand is readily available, at least in my local market. You may want to thicken this a little to help mimic the silky texture of a port. I'd recommend starting with about 12 liquid oz, bringing ...


7

You probably are used to having a lot of sugar in your mixes. Use lime-ade instead of lime juice, or add some simple syrup. Adding orange juice also helps. Of course, this isn't "traditional", but you'll probably like it better. If you're looking for a ratio, I would try something like 2 parts tequila, 1 part triple sec, 2 parts lime-ade, 2 parts orange ...


7

For a substance to burn, it must first reach its ignition point. For it to keep burning, it must reach its fire point. The ignition point of a 40% ABV liquid such as brandy is 26ºC/79ºF, and the fire point is approximately 10ºC higher than that. What this means in practical terms is that you need to heat the alcohol a little first before you add it to the ...


7

Just use artificial rum flavoring in the recipe instead of rum.


7

Whiskey is quite high in alcohol, on the order of 40% by volume, and is not hospitable to pathogens growing. The flask is intended to hold liqueur, and so is made from or lined with a food safe material, such as food grade stainless steel (assuming you have one from a reputable manufacturer). So yes, it should be fine. Remember: when it was brewed, the ...


7

If the restaurant or bar is using a margarita mix, they frequently contain additional syrups and stabilizing gums or starches which add body to the drinks. It could also be that the high powered blenders frequently used in bars will be better at creating a smoother and thicker texture, or a more 'emulsified' slush. If you want to try making it thicker at ...


7

It sounds like you are looking for Pisang Ambon, a banana liqeur, which is seethrough and green. It is popularly served over ice, mixed with orange juice for a Tutti Frutti kind of drink. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pisang_Ambon


7

I recently had exactly the same challenge with Lasagna Bolognese. I substituted white balsamic vinegar diluted 50/50 with water for the wine. The final sauce was actually superior to the sauce I had just made a few days prior with the same recipe but using wine.


7

Please do not use a cooking wine. Those are awful. Pick a juice, any juice. I'd say cranberry. You probably don't want anything too sweet.


6

You could try Peychaud's Bitters (difficult to find), Fernet-Branca, orange bitters or other types of bitters. Worcestershire sauce may also be used as a substitute but works well in savory dishes. I wouldn't recommend it for a Manhattan. Or, if you're very ambitious you can try to make your own bitters, although the ingredient list is somewhat ...


6

This answer is specific to scotch whisky. In the process of making scotch whisky, distillers traditionally burn bales of dried peat moss to stop the the barley. The peat smoke produces "phenolic" compounds which give the scotch its smokey flavor. That's why smoky scotches are also called "peaty" (or have "high phenols" or "high PPM"). Phenols are highly ...


6

In November 2007 a recipe was published in Cooks Illustrated for a Foolproof Pie dough with vodka. That recipe was created by J. Kenji Lopez-Alt who was one of the chefs on America's Test Kitchen and writer for Cooks Illustrated. He has an article about the recipe here ...


6

The only dessert I can think of where alcohol would be truly done on a portion by portion basis would be the type of ice cream parfait we used to serve at a restaurant I worked at in my long ago youth: it was essentially vanilla ice cream layered in a parfait glass with a sweet liqueur such has au de noisette or Framboise--the possibilities are endless. ...


6

Can you make rum balls without rum? Well... I suppose you could use rum extract, which has a very intense rum flavor. You would also want to add some sugar syrup or water to make up for the lost moisture in your recipe. However, you would not get the exact same outcome due to the lack of the evaporative effect of the alcohol when eating the confection, ...


5

You can replace the moisture provided by wine with just about any flavorful liquid, but you won't replicate the flavor. Vinegars will be the closest, but they are much more acidic. Stocks and broths can help boost flavor, but they will bring with them a lot of sodium. The list goes on, as shown by the other contributors here. The main thing to be mindful of ...



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