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10

Sunflower lecithin (sorry, best link I could find) is gaining in popularity as an alternative to soy lecithin because it is widely perceived to have a neutral taste and actually has superior emulsifying properties. It's a little on the expensive side, though. Soy lecithin by itself doesn't taste horrible if you buy it as a food additive (as opposed to a ...


9

Generally lowfat sauces use tricks to get texture and some semblance of flavour. Starches and thickeners give the illusion of richness, while vast quantities of salt somewhat mask the lack of cheese and butter. Anyone with half a palette can tell at first taste though. Make it seldom, but make it properly.


6

According to Cooking The Roman Way by David Downie, Fettucine Alfredo is a traditional Roman recipe called "pasta del cornuti" (cuckold's pasta). What either Alfredo Di Lelio III, or Mario Mozzetti, depending on whom you believe, invented in 1914, was the dramatic tableside preparation of Fettuccine Alfredo, which is what made the dish a hit with visiting ...


6

The real stuff is expensive because it's still actually cheese. If you're gonna use the canned stuff, you're probably better off just leaving it out entirely (or sprinkling it on top at the table as-desired...) It doesn't take a lot of cheese either - it's pretty strong stuff. You can probably get away with just a few ounces...


5

Whipping cream is sold in versions that contain sugar and versions that don't contain sugar. Did you use a version that contains sugar? If so, try the version without.


5

Are you absolutely certain that the "grittiness" is caused by the cheese not melting, and not because the sauce is curdling? If you cook it too long or too fast, that is what will happen. If you must use the Kraft stuff (personally, I think it has no flavour compared to real Reggiano), try melting the cheese on low heat in a very small amount of cream ...


5

Emulsions aren't necessarily all about oil vs. water. Alfredo sauce is actually an emulsion of cream and butter, both of which contain varying amounts of both water and fat, and in many cases, if you bought them from a supermarket rather than a farm, also a fair amount of emulsifiers. Any emulsion is going to be temperamental and not respond well to sudden ...


4

Throw out the low-fat sauce. Make alfredo. Alfredo is a very, very simple sauce at its heart. Most recipes consist essentially only of two or three ingredients such as cream, butter, and parmesan, perhaps with some garlic or pepper. So if you don't have low-fat restrictions, don't use a low fat version as a base. Just make the sauce from your recipe ...


4

I think mfg is close, but the issue isn't time -- it's temperature. Don't microwave at full power; I tend to go with 30-50% power for anything milk based, depending if you know you have a microwave that tends to be slower/faster than the recommended cook times on things. And of course, check on it, possibly stir once it once or twice during re-heating so ...


4

Unless there was sugar in your cream, there's nothing particularly sweet about this combination. Did you salt the pasta water to roughly seawater saltiness? If not, did you adjust salt before serving? If your pasta water was under-salted, that would explain the sweetness, since the only significant source of salt otherwise was the parmesan. Heavy cream is ...


4

OOOH! I finally get to share the alfredo sauce recipe I developed for low fatness and good flavor, adapted in part from bechamil sauce out of Joy of Cooking: 1/2 cup flour 1/2 cup X virgin olive oil Preheat oven to 250 degrees F / 100 degrees C Set your oven proof pan (use one that has a good cover) corning ware can be used for this, on a burner set to ...


4

This is an old question, but for the sake of completeness: Parmesan, even the high-end stuff, really doesn't melt well. I've found that in any sauce containing it, it's got to be grated as finely as possible, or you get little globules of it that won't ever dissolve. That's tough to do with pre-grated Kraft cheese, but if you can find a good price on block ...


3

The longer the cheese has aged, the better cooking quality, that's why Italian restaurants, at least the decent ones only use Reggiano to cook with. Things like Grano or less expensive cheese should be used as garnish. You need to take the cooked pasta, add it to the cream over high, until it is almost reduced to what you want, pull it off the heat, add a ...


3

Cheap grated cheese is LOADED with anti-caking agents that make it pour out of the container easily. I'm not sure what these additives are, but they don't melt, and they taste like eating a spoonful of dry flour. If you use that sort of stuff to cook, it will ruin your sauce. My rule is that I only cook with cooking ingredients. Products in the store that ...


2

Try brightening the flavor by using herbs and flavors that go well with a cream base. Use your low fat sauce as the creamy background to highlight fresh chives, basil or lemon zest - or all three. Try adding sautéed mushrooms to the recipe if they're not already in it or top the dish with a light drizzle of truffle oil. And Aleppo pepper is a fabulous way ...


2

This is 100% about flavor. Butter will give you this, EVOO will give you that, ... Butter will give you a 'richer' taste, whatever that may mean for you. Extra Virgin Olive Oil, generally speaking is far more powerful and may become overwhelming. Any other oil will give you a different taste profile. Sunflower oil may be the most neutral and therefor the ...


2

The longer it is in the microwave the more the oil will separate. I guess the only recommendation is to nuke it to the minimum tolerable temperature. Try covering with a ceramic bowl or other insulator (phsycist?); I think it may do well to trap steam and add a second heating mechanic.


1

The best way to freeze something is to do it fast. Chill the food first in the refrigerator before putting it in the freezer. Keeping the food thin/flat rather than thick will help the center to chill faster. Loading up a sheet pan with individual portions works well for this - just be sure you have room for it in the refrigerator and freezer. However, ...


1

Per the previous question about Fettucine Alfredo, the traditional Alfredo only uses butter, parmigiano, cheese, and pasta. So your recipe already contains several substitutions and changes from a traditional Alfredo. I'm not sure making one more (the olive oil) really made that much of a difference. For a traditional Alfredo it would be pretty much ...


1

Hypothetically speaking, if you are stuck with the dairy ingredients you have and are looking for a way to harness the sweetness, but don't want to add food ingredients, you could add sage and basil to make it more savory but keep to the sweet notes. While the sage gives you a nice base, basil will take you past the sweetness with its floral notes.



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