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11

It's semantic nitpicking. Tofu is defined as soy milk, curdled and pressed. Some people who don't care about oriental culinary tradition think of tofu as any non-dairy milk that is curdled and pressed into a curd. Technically your almond tofu would be almond milk curd or some such. In reality your coworker is being pedantic and I would accept the term ...


7

From: http://www.practicallyedible.com/edible.nsf/pages/sliveredalmonds Slivered almonds are almonds that have been sliced very thinly into little sticks. They differ from sliced almonds, which are almonds sliced across their diameter giving you much bigger pieces. If you can't keep the shape distinction clear in your head, think of getting a sliver ...


6

I think on some level you'll just get what you get with something hard like an almond. A really really sharp knife with a thin blade can help, but you can only do so much. My hand-cut ones are always a bit on the raggedy side. When using a food processor, try smaller batches to leave bigger or more consistent pieces. You don't have to pulse as long to get ...


6

I don't think I've ever seen peanut butter grow mold, natural or commercial, refrigerated or not. What will happen with natural peanut butter is that the fat (of which there's plenty) will go rancid over time. The oxidation process that leads to rancidity requires heat, light, and usually oxygen; keeping it in the refrigerator will therefore slow the ...


5

I am Chinese from Hong Kong and there is a dessert called "almond tofu" IN CHINESE. The "almond" part refers to the almond extract, one of the ingredients. The "tofu" part refers to the texture of the final product, similar to silken tofu. It is really a jelly made from milk and jellying agent. The jellying agent can be unflavored gelatin or agar agar. ...


5

It is no wonder you can't keep them whole. There isn't anything in the recipe to give them integrity. A normal pancake has lots of egg and lots of flour. When you are frying them, the proteins of the egg uncurl and connect to their neighbours to set in a loose, weak mesh. You know how the egg white sets when you fry an egg without whisking it? That happens ...


5

You're missing an important step here: You need to use cold water immediately after the boiling water in order to halt the cooking process. Boil them for about 1 minute, then drain. (You can pour boiling water over them, as in the case of almonds - it doesn't really matter how you do this.) Submerge or rinse in cold water, to prevent any further cooking ...


5

A basic Google search hit on numerous sites all which agree that almond paste can be frozen with no deterioration of the product. The key is to wrap it up in several layers of plastic bags or plastic, then aluminum foil to keep out other flavors from the freezer as my experience has been that ground nuts will absorb odors if improperly wrapped. Once in ...


3

If they truly are rancid, then you should just discard them. Any use of the almonds or their oil will just impart a terrible taste into the dish in which they are used. If they have gone sour (I am not sure how that would be possible), then something is very wrong, perhaps an unusual type of spoilage, and similarly you should just discard them for safety ...


3

Generally, there is no reason not to use it. However, I'm hard pressed to think of a good place, generally because good cooking prefers other, stronger flavored liquids instead of water. An application where you can have the flavor on its own would be making ayran or a lassi. I think it would be an improvement over plain-water-ayran. For other uses, just ...


2

Wheat Flours at Cook's Thesaurus discusses varieties of wheat flours and their substitutions in general baking, yeast breads, and as breading agents. And here's a reference discussing "the carbohydrate-content, dietary fiber content and 'net carbs' in all types of flour": Carbohydrates in Flour and Baking Foods. I consult these pages as jumping off points ...


2

I find roasting any nut simpler with a bit of glue, some egg white in addition to any flavouring. I use one egg white mixed with a bit of water per 2C of nuts. Toss in the egg white, then in the flavour (salt, sugar, honey, spice, etc.), and bake off at 300-350, depending on the size of nut (lower for larger nuts).


2

Tofu is a specific word; it's a Chinese word that literally means "bean curd". (Pretty much every source that gives a definition of "tofu" agrees - I would say every source, but it's the Internet so I'm sure ther's misinformation out there.) Therefore, you cannot have tofu made of almonds. You can have an almond product that has the consistency and texture ...


2

I think that both will do the purpose you are looking for. The soaking is more to bring the nutrients out of the almond before preparing the dish you need them for or in this case the milk. I would try just the soaking once and if you want it more sweet then bitter add the sugar into the water you are soaking it in, this might neutralize the bitterness in ...


2

Almond flour and almond meal are pretty much interchangeable terms. What you are essentially looking for is the finest ground almonds you can get hold of. I buy ground almonds (because they're easily obtained) and sift them to get the finest bits. This isn't very economical (90g of fine almonds from a 150g bag, usually) but you can use the coarser bits in ...


2

To summarize the comments: Use common household tools (such as pliers) as improvised nutcrackers Try using the bottle gripper/opener on kitchen shears as an improvised nutcracker Use impact tools, such as a hammer, a heavy pan, or even cleaned rocks as nut smashers, but you may not get whole nutmeats with this method Bite the bullet and buy or borrow a ...


2

I use a Cuisinart food processor to make almond butter. I once used a processor that was not very powerful and it burnt out (my brothers, so I had to replace it). You'll need a machine with significant wattage because it takes a bit of energy to grind up almonds unless you are making a very small quantity. Sorry, I don't think there is a way around that. The ...


1

You will have to use a blender, grinding produces nut flour, not nut butter. You normally start from whole nuts, but now you have some preground ones, they should work too. Be aware that most blenders don't have the power to produce nut butters. If you have a high-powered blender, it is still a hassle, because it is too thick. You have to use enough nuts ...


1

Throw them out! If they look funny or smell funny do not ingest them. I recently took a graduate level Mycology lab course where we learned about the dangers of the fungus Aspergillus producing extremely toxic metabolites called aflatoxins, especially in nuts. The metabolites can stick around through processing, so oil extraction won't "clean" the almonds if ...


1

I found these slides that may help. The information is a difficult to interpret, but the page with conclusions says that the optimal roast uses the lowest possible temperature for 20 to 30 minutes. This however is information for the food industry and it is clearly geared towards increasing shelf-life which you are probably not too concerned about. If you ...


1

I imagine the argument for almonds roasted at lower temperatures relates to the notion that roasting at higher temperatures would change the chemical structure of the oils and others in the nut. This is a pretty common notion like with cold pressed oils vs. oils that have been heated through its processing. ...


1

According to this article on how.com (regarding low-carb diets), if you use only blanched almonds, instead of ones with skins, you'll get a finer flour: http://lowcarbdiets.about.com/od/products/p/almondmeal.htm


1

Here I'm assuming that you mean macaroons as in the French patisserie macarons rather than the simpler coconut or almond based macaroons. In any case almond meal and almond flour are essentially the same thing, both are almonds ground into a fine (or not so much in your case) 'flour' or 'powder'. Apparently, almond flour is made from 'blanched' (almonds ...


1

For raw, harder, and bulkier nuts like Almonds try a slightly lower temperature, say 180°C (350°F), and for a longer time For re-roasting previously roasted nuts use a microwave oven (I know...). Same recipe, but just a few minutes on high. Watch them the first few times until you find the magic time limit before they start to burn Commercially more and ...


1

You could use it when making horchata. It is a drink made with rice, cinnamon, sugar and water. Almonds and/or milk are used in some variants. Use your almond flavoured water instead of plain water when soaking the rice. This recipe might give you a starting point: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/gale-gand/horchata-recipe/index.html


1

Whenever I want chopped almonds, I always use the food processor. If I want small pieces, I set the speed of the blade high and if I want larger pieces, I just set lower speed. Of course I will still get some tiny bits, but most almonds, even after longish processing, are cut into 2-4 pieces.


1

If you are looking for wheat flour substitutes, you might want to look into gluten free baking. While it's more than you need, in gluten-free baking no wheat flour is used. Note that gluten-free baking has many subtleties and complexities (as opposed to almond meal and parmesan breading, which is quite tasty and similar to panko or other breadcrumbs). If ...



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