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You can make your own extract easily using vodka/neutral spirits and crushed almonds, filling a glass jar with half vodka/neutral spirits and half crushed almonds, letting it sit for a month or so to extract the flavor and oils, you can make a vanilla extract in the same way.


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They're really thin, so it's a really small amount of food. I wouldn't feel at all guilty about pitching them, but if you do want to use them, that means the main way it'll really matter is if you use them for texture or appearance. But usually we do the opposite: remove the skins from nuts to make something with a smooth texture and uniform color. So I ...


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You can use them in baking cookies, cupcakes,or you can even dry them, grind them and then add in yoghurt or condensed milk or ice cream. You can even use them to cleanse your skin by simply grinding and mixing with your daily face wash. Hope this helps...


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Some things that are made almost entirely of almonds (plus elbow grease), and thus will use up a large quantity of almonds: Almond butter (need to add: nothing. Well, salt, if you like.) Almond milk (need to add: water) And then there are more dessert recipes than you can shake a stick at, but they take increasing amounts of other ingredients, and thus ...


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Assuming that they are not rancid...almond brittle (or mixed nut brittle...with other nuts, pecans, cashews, peanuts). There are many recipes out there like this one: http://www.myrecipes.com/recipe/almond-brittle. This one will use them up about a cup at a time (1 cup whole == 3/4 cup chopped +/-)


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As Stephie implied, after "a couple years", I'd bet your raw almonds are rancid and whatever you do with them would just be throwing good ingredients after bad. But eat a couple and see for yourself. If they're ok, I'd make almond butter, that would let you use all of them quickly.


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Almost all nuts, so long as they haven't gone rancid on you, are very versatile: Whenever I travel, I bring a bag of raw almonds. (raw simply because I prefer the flavor to roasted). If I end up missing a meal (not enough time to grab food when changing flights, sessions ran long and I'm tired from jetlag, meetings over lunch, etc.), then I have ...


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Your best bet for this is xanthan gum, which is an excellent stabiliser. Whilst the distinction between 'natural' and 'unnatural' is fraught with difficulties, insofar as xanthan gum is a product of microbial fermentation then it is no more 'unnatural' than alcohol or vinegar. Be careful not to use too much though (unless, of course, you want your drink ...


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You can purchase soy lecithin from good cooking suppliers or online, about 0.5% lecithin by volume of fat will emulsify it well. Many soy lecithins are not GMO free I have not tried soy lecithin with almond milk, but it works for soy milk For an alternative, try sunflower lecithin, usually available in health food/supplement shops. It is more likely to be ...


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You can add things like lecithin or flax seeds to help keep your milk emulsified, but it will still probably separate in hot liquid. To prevent that, you might try to add something fattier to your milk, like coconut.



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