Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

14

True southern grits are made with ground hominy whereas polenta is simply ground cornmeal. The proper name for them is actually hominy grits. You can make "grits" out of untreated corn, but these are corn grits and not really found in southern US cuisine. Grits are typically a much coarser grind than polenta. Hominy is corn that has been nixtamalized, which ...


14

No. Those are not common pizza toppings in America at all. In America there are these (rather well known) pizza styles: Chicago style Chicago style pizza is a deep-dish pizza that is baked in a thick heavy cornmeal based crust. The toppings are also added in reverse order of a traditional pizza. First the cheese is added, then a pound or more of sausage ...


10

We call that style of pizza Cognitive Dissonance here in America. Corn anywhere in or near a pizza? That's just crazy talk. In fact, now that i think about it, i can't remember seeing corn in the same room as pizza. (Maybe they're mortal enemies, or alter egos.) Others have described the various official American pizza styles and provided great links. ...


8

As someone who has raised beef cattle (here in Oklahoma) I must say the TFD is (unfortunately) mistaken, (at least here in the U.S.) Most cattle fall into one of two varieties, Beef and Dairy (there are also some breeds that are almost exclusively show cattle) The most popular (and common) Beef varieties are Angus, Limousine, Herefords, Longhorn; This list, ...


7

Common Toppings in the United States are: Meat Pepperoni Ham Bacon Ground Beef Italian Sausage Vegetables Green Bell Peppers Red Bell Peppers Onions Mushrooms Black Olives There are a couple other toppings that are used almost exclusively on a single pizza type BBQ Chicken Pizza - Chicken with BBQ sauce instead of a tomato based sauce Hawaiian ...


6

There's a great YouTube video by Rhett & Link called the The BBQ Song (A Review of BBQ in the Southern United States) that is actually a really good starting point for answering this question. Here are the lyrics to the song: In the mountains of Tennessee, they like a smoky sauce; But over there in ol' Memphis, a dry-rubbed rib is boss. The ...


6

There are several major varieties of clam chowder, which you can find enumerated on the Wikipedia page. New England clam chowder is characterized by a dairy base, usually with some sort of salt pork or bacon, and potatoes. Note: the term chowder basically just means soup or stew, usually with seafood of some sort--very different dishes may go by the name.


6

It's for the same reason that all sparkling wine is in America is called 'champagne'. We don't participate in PDO / PGI / DOP / etc. agreements with most foreign countries. We do have requirements for specifically American-made items to have similar tules, such as Bourbon (so Jack Daniels is Tennessee Whiskey, not Bourbon). But just as America doesn't ...


5

The previously accepted answer contains a good link, but not any information here on Seasoned Advice, so I thought I would write out a few things from my understanding after having developed an abiding interest in Cajun foods over the past decade. Basically, Creole is a much broader term with a longer history. While it is perhaps inaccurate to say Cajun is ...


5

The most common preparation is tomato sauce and parmesan cheese. Of course, some Americans will tell you that the only truly American way to eat spaghetti is to top it with chili, then shredded cheddar cheese, then chopped onions, then red kidney beans. It's hard to fully express the majesty of this dish, and should only be enjoyed on special occasions, ...


5

I might refer you to this video, where Malcolm Gladwell talks (a little bit) about spaghetti, and how Americans prefer to eat it. Apparently, companies doing market research found that Americans say they want "real Italian pasta sauce," which is somewhat thinner than "American style," but actually prefer eating the chunkier, heartier sauces now common on ...


5

Taken from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/San_Francisco_burrito Two key technologies that made the San Francisco burrito possible are the large flour tortilla and tortilla steamers, which together increase the flexibility, stretch, and size of the resulting tortilla. The tortilla steamer saturates the gluten-heavy tortilla with moisture and heat, ...


4

Some people say it's just preparation and the base is the same ground corn / corn meal, some people say for grits you need (more coarsely) ground hominy (which is corn that has been soaked in lye or lime). Polenta can be found loose and really solid: grits are generally loose. Corn type may also differ, as may the dish's 'typical cultural trappings' (fat ...


4

Check out this very comprehensive article on Slice that describes the regional pizza styles in America. Each style below links directly to a nice description and picture. http://slice.seriouseats.com/archives/2008/01/a-list-of-regional-pizza-styles.html The article lists 21 distinct styles: Neapolitan-style pizza New York–Neapolitan (aka ...


4

What country are you in? Most countries offer beef from all their cow varieties. Most are very similar, though some have slightly better properties for certain cooking styles. But these are mostly offset by condition on the animal, feed quality, and age A good butcher would know not only what kind of cow it was, but what farm it came from (hopefully a ...


4

I would 'cut' a standard cream cheese like Philadelphia with mascarpone, which is essentially triple cream with a cream cheese-like texture.


4

I know of three ways for a recipe to become standardized, and I doubt that any of them applies to your sub. The first one is: someone creates a recipe and is well-known enough for people to imitate him. Then it gets called the name he gave it originally. Example: Sachertorte. There is just one recipe for it, created by Franz Sacher, and any deviations are ...


4

Those look absolutely perfect and it is normal for them to be very soft straight out of the oven. They will get chewy as they cool and dry out a little.


3

It's an American sandwich, not actually Italian, and as such is subject to the whims of a thousand urban sandwich shop entrepreneurs. The only variations I know of from your description are to drop the onion, add pepperoncini peppers, or to drop the prosciutto (pricy) in favor of cheaper lunch meats (mortadella, bologna, or even turkey).


3

No, there is no such thing. That is just one of those wacky things where folks in one country are doing a sort of caricature of what they think folks in another country eat. Hilarious, but in no way authentic.


3

Short version: American pizza has pepperoni, the meat product that's like a really bad hot salami (pepperoni means pepper in Italian). Corn in pizza is weird, but most non-Americans think Americans only eat corn and only drink coke. Long version: America is a very big country. More than 5x the population of Italy and many more times the size... I lived ...


3

There are four pizza toppings or combinations that are the most popular in the US: Cheese - nothing but tomato sauce and mozzarella (sometimes a blend of cheeses) Pepperoni - add pepperoni to a cheese pizza Supreme - many variations, but commonly tomato sauce, mozzarella, pepperoni, loose ground pork sausage (or "Italian" sausage), bell peppers, mushrooms ...


3

The cookies will set (take on their final texture) about by 20 - 30 minutes out of the oven. Coming directly out of the oven, cookies will absolutely be soft and squishable; which is why you should wait a few minutes before moving them off the baking sheet and onto a cooling rack (you can cheat this time if your cookies are all on a sheet of parchment ...


3

The rules for "Kobe Beef" labeling in final food products (like a burger) are lax. For the burger to cost $13-$15, it´s only possible using "Kobe-style" beef. These are Wagyu cattle raised by ranchers in the USA, typically bread with Angus cattle. The other option is Wagyu cattle raised in the "Kobe Style" in any other area that is not Kobe, Japan. Source: ...


3

Par-cooking potatoes is an extremely common technique. However, the shredded or grated kind of hash browns would be very difficult to par-cook with wet methods, as they would go to mush quite quickly if you tried to simmer them, and then you would have the trouble of squeezing out the water afterwards (which is necessary so they crisp up, and so they finish ...


2

By far, my most common pasta dish to cook is spaghetti in tomato sauce, straight outa my California Heritage Cookbook. Can't get more American than that, can you? ;-) This tomato sauce is no marinara. It has ground beef, mushrooms, onions, garlic, and celery, and is otherwise made from a base of tomato sauce (29 oz) and tomato paste (6 oz), which gives it a ...


2

Besides what @Aaronut mentioned with Cincinnati style chili, if we're talking pasta in general, and not just spaghetti, I'd say the "American" pasta dish is macaroni and cheese -- from a box. Although there's regional variations (eg, lobster in New England), it's found in a much wider area than (N)-way chili (3: spaghetti,chili,cheese; 4: add onions; 5: add ...


2

Normally tomato sauce (Ragu, Prego, etc) with Parmesean cheese on top.


2

Reading the definition of grits ("a dish of coarsely ground corn kernels boiled with water or milk"), the only difference I see with polenta (living in an Italian region where it's largely used) is that polenta is not made with milk. Other differences could be: The coarse grade of the ground corn kernels. The type of corn kernels used; we use also ...


2

I think you're looking for New York Italian pasta. The major influence on New York pasta was the unavailability of good quality pastas for quite some time. The changed the ethos of the dishes from "It's all about the pasta" (the Italian way) to "It's all about the sauce" (the American way) So what happened was the sauces became very heavy meat sauces ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible